Ogawasuwa Shrine's Weeping Cherry Blossom

Ogawasuwa Shrine's Weeping Cherry Blossom

Selected by Iwaki City as a Natural Monument, the great weeping cherry tree is over 500 years old. The flowers bloom slightly earlier than those of Yoshino cherry trees, and are lit up by traditional Japanese lanterns in the evenings of cherry blossom season. Stretching even further down than the roots, the weeping branches of the tree give it an extremely beautiful appearance.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://kankou--iwaki-or-jp.translate.goog/spot/10071?_x_tr_sl=auto&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=ja
Contact

Iwaki Tourism and City Planning Bureau
(+81) 246-44-6545
https://kankou-iwaki.or.jp/ (Automatic translation into English available)

(+81) 246-44-6545

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable (Space for 30 vehicles available)
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time for seeing cherry blossoms: Early April
Access Details
AccessTakahagi Ienomae 140-1, Ogawa-machi, Iwaki City, Fukushima Pref. 979-3122
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min from the Iwaki Chuo I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway

By Train: 15 min by taxi from Iwaki Station (JR Joban Line). Alternatively, take the Joban Line to Ogawago Station (JR Ban-etsu East Line), from where the shrine is just a 15 min walk away.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Cherry Blossoms in Baryo Park

As the park's 630 Somei Yoshino cherry blossom trees bloom simultaneously, it is easy to be swept away by the scenery. You will be able to enjoy the coming of spring as you walk along rows of cherry blossom trees on the sando (a road which runs from the torii gate to the shrine).Baryo Park is a well-known location for viewing cherry blossoms, and every year from early to mid April the park holds a light-up event at night. We recommend you visit in the evening to see the cherry blossoms illuminated by the lights from the paper lanterns. A good spot for taking pictures is at the bottom of the sando, looking up at the torii.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Shioyazaki Lighthouse

Shioyazaki Lighthouse (塩屋崎灯台) stands on the Usuiso Coast of Iwaki City in eastern Fukushima. Now a historical landmark, the lighthouse was first erected in 1899. Despite having sustained considerable damage from natural disasters over the years, including the 2011 tsunami, the lighthouse has been rebuilt and restored and now enjoys great popularity. Many visitors climb to the top to enjoy its stunning views of the ocean.It was counted among the 50 best lighthouses in Japan. Consider visiting during sunset: seeing the ocean bathed in the beautiful afternoon light is the perfect way to end the day.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Daihisan Stone Buddhas (Daihisan no Sekibutsu)

Estimated to have been carved over 1,000 years ago, the Daihisan Stone Buddhas (大悲山の石仏) are a group of stone-carved Buddhas in Odaka, Minamisoma City, in the coastal area of Fukushima prefecture.The Daihisan Stone Buddhas are made up of three groups of statues: the Yakushido Buddhas (薬師堂石仏), the Amidado Buddha (阿弥陀堂石仏), and the Kannondo Buddha (観音堂石仏). The statues are enshrined in a forest area with many smaller Buddha statues.They are the biggest and oldest stone Buddha statues in the Tohoku area of Japan, and have been designated as a National Historical Site. Their origins, and much of their history, however, remain unknown, although they are presumed to have been built sometime during the Heian period of Japanese history, which goes from 794 to 1185.In front of the entrance to the Yakushido Buddhas is a 45 meter high cedar tree known as Daihisan’s Giant Japanese Cedar Tree. The tree has a circumference of 8.4 meters at eye level, and is one of the largest trees in Fukushima prefecture, also estimated to be over 1,000 years old. It is designated as a Natural Monument of Fukushima Prefecture.

You might also like

Shiramizu Amidado Temple
History & Culture

Shiramizu Amidado Temple

Shiramizu Amidado Temple (Amitabha Hall) was constructed in 1160 by Princess Tokuhime of the Oushu Fujiwara clan, which built the "golden culture" in Oushu (the present Tohoku Region). It is the only building in Fukushima Prefecture that has been designated as a national treasure. Inside the hall stands a wooden statue of Amida Nyorai as well as a number of other Buddhist statues such as Kannon Bosatsu, Seishi Bosatsu, Jikoku Tenno, and Tamon Tenno.The garden, called Jodo Teien (Jodo, or "the pure land", is the Buddhist paradise) is a realm of natural beauty in every season. The scenery is especially breathtaking in summer when the lotus flowers are in bloom, prompting one famous writer to liken the garden to a mythical paradise.

Soma Nakamura Shrine
History & Culture

Soma Nakamura Shrine

Soma Nakamura Shrine, long revered for enshrining the patron deity of the Soma clan, is built on a small hill in the western area of the Nakamura Castle grounds.The shrine was erected in 1643 by Soma Yoshitsune, the 18th head of the Soma family.The main shrine is a an example of Gongen Shinto architecture, in which the main hall and worship hall are connected by a passageway, and the lacquer, painting, and metal fixtures are authentic representations of its Kan'ei era construction.The shrine was designated as a national important cultural property in 1984.

Daihisan Stone Buddhas (Daihisan no Sekibutsu)
History & Culture

Daihisan Stone Buddhas (Daihisan no Sekibutsu)

Estimated to have been carved over 1,000 years ago, the Daihisan Stone Buddhas (大悲山の石仏) are a group of stone-carved Buddhas in Odaka, Minamisoma City, in the coastal area of Fukushima prefecture.The Daihisan Stone Buddhas are made up of three groups of statues: the Yakushido Buddhas (薬師堂石仏), the Amidado Buddha (阿弥陀堂石仏), and the Kannondo Buddha (観音堂石仏). The statues are enshrined in a forest area with many smaller Buddha statues.They are the biggest and oldest stone Buddha statues in the Tohoku area of Japan, and have been designated as a National Historical Site. Their origins, and much of their history, however, remain unknown, although they are presumed to have been built sometime during the Heian period of Japanese history, which goes from 794 to 1185.In front of the entrance to the Yakushido Buddhas is a 45 meter high cedar tree known as Daihisan’s Giant Japanese Cedar Tree. The tree has a circumference of 8.4 meters at eye level, and is one of the largest trees in Fukushima prefecture, also estimated to be over 1,000 years old. It is designated as a Natural Monument of Fukushima Prefecture.

Top