Soma Nakamura Shrine

Soma Nakamura Shrine

Soma Nakamura Shrine, long revered for enshrining the patron deity of the Soma clan, is built on a small hill in the western area of the Nakamura Castle grounds. The shrine was erected in 1643 by Soma Yoshitsune, the 18th head of the Soma family. The main shrine is a an example of Gongen Shinto architecture, in which the main hall and worship hall are connected by a passageway, and the lacquer, painting, and metal fixtures are authentic representations of its Kan'ei era construction. The shrine was designated as a national important cultural property in 1984.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://soma-kanko.jp/trip/nakamura-zinzya/(Japanese)
Contact

Soma City Tourism Association

(+81) 244-35-3300

Best Season
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

Open all day

ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessKita-machi 140, Nakamura, Soma City, Fukushima Pref. 976-0042
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 7 min from the Soma I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway

By Train: 10 min by taxi (or a 25 min walk) from Soma Station on the JR Joban Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Museums & Galleries

Iwaki 3.11 Memorial and Revitalization Museum

Opened on Saturday, May 30, 2020, the museum was established to share the history of the disaster and the following reconstruction efforts by preserving and exhibiting materials related to the earthquake and tsunami, giving talks by local storytellers, and other activities. This way, they are able to preserve the memories and lessons of the disaster.  There are panel displays about the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear power plant accident, as well as about recovery and reconstruction, and displays of actual items damaged in the disaster, such as a blackboard from the former Toyoma Junior High School. The Iwaki Storyteller's Group offers regular lectures on the disaster. For more information on lectures, please visit this website.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Shiramizu Amidado Temple

Shiramizu Amidado Temple (Amitabha Hall) was constructed in 1160 by Princess Tokuhime of the Oushu Fujiwara clan, which built the "golden culture" in Oushu (the present Tohoku Region). It is the only building in Fukushima Prefecture that has been designated as a national treasure. Inside the hall stands a wooden statue of Amida Nyorai as well as a number of other Buddhist statues such as Kannon Bosatsu, Seishi Bosatsu, Jikoku Tenno, and Tamon Tenno. The garden, called Jodo Teien (Jodo, or "the pure land", is the Buddhist paradise) is a realm of natural beauty in every season. The scenery is especially breathtaking in summer when the lotus flowers are in bloom, prompting one famous writer to liken the garden to the mythical paradise.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Hattachi-Yakushi Temple

In the year 806, the holy priest Tokuichi constructed Hattachi-Yakushi Temple as a place of worship for the Buddhist deity who has the ability to ensure the safe voyage of seafarers. The temple grounds are extremely beautiful in spring when the hydrangeas bloom, earning the temple the local nickname ‘Hydrangea Temple’. In front of Hattachi-Yakushi Temple is Bentenjima Island and Shrine, and the Hattachi Coastline, which connects the mainland with the island. The Hattachi Coast is covered in unique gravel, which has traditionally been thought to have healing properties. However, removing a stone and bringing it home can have the opposite effect.

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Hattachi-Yakushi Temple
Historical Sites

Hattachi-Yakushi Temple

In the year 806, the holy priest Tokuichi constructed Hattachi-Yakushi Temple as a place of worship for the Buddhist deity who has the ability to ensure the safe voyage of seafarers. The temple grounds are extremely beautiful in spring when the hydrangeas bloom, earning the temple the local nickname ‘Hydrangea Temple’. In front of Hattachi-Yakushi Temple is Bentenjima Island and Shrine, and the Hattachi Coastline, which connects the mainland with the island. The Hattachi Coast is covered in unique gravel, which has traditionally been thought to have healing properties. However, removing a stone and bringing it home can have the opposite effect.

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