Tenzan Bunko Museum

Tenzan Bunko Museum

Tenzan Bunko is a quaint old-fashioned house stood in beautiful Kawauchi Village, which has been opened up as a museum. This house was presented by the village to the famous Japanese poet Kusano Shinpei. Kusano found inspiration to create many of his works at Tenzan Bunko, and this house now serves as the venue for the annual Tenzan Poetry Festival, which gives local people and poets a place to meet and network.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kawauchimura.jp/page/page000108.html(Japanese)
Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Closed: Mondays (Open if Monday falls on a National Holiday)

ParkingAvailable (Space for 5 cars)
Entrance FeeAdults: 300 yen | High school & college students: 250 yen | Elementary & Junior high school students: 150 yen<br> Discount available for group visits of 20 people or more.
Access Details
AccessHayawata-513, Kamikawauchi, Kawauchi Village, Futaba District, Fukushima Pref. 979-1201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min from Joban Tomioka I.C. exit (Joban Expressway). Or 40 min from Funehiki Miharu I.C. exit (Ban-etsu Expressway)

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