Handmade Japanese Washi Paper Craft Experience

Handmade Japanese Washi Paper Craft Experience

Kami-Kawasaki Washi paper has a history of over 1,000 years. It was given the name "Kami-Kawasaki Washi" because of its origin in Nihonmatsu City's Kami-Kawasaki district. Since the name of districts changes with the years, during Japan's Heian Period, it was known as "Michinoku-gami "("paper made in Michinoku").

Kami-Kawasaki Washi paper has been used regularly as shoji paper (paper for sliding doors). Many people are charmed by the warmth and simple beauty of Kami-Kawasaki Washi. Paper mulberry, a type of tree used for making the paper, is grown locally. The traditional production method, from producing the raw ingredients to making the paper, is continued in Nihonmatsu City even today.

Sticking to traditional production methods ensures that the finished paper has a luxuriant warmth and refinement, and is strong and durable. At present, a variety of products, such as dyed paper, folkcraft paper, and paper crafts, are produced, all of which maintain the paper's original texture. Although the demand for shoji paper is declining, there is still demand for products such as wallpaper and lamp shades. In this way, Kami-Kawasaki Washi remains important to us everyday.
 

At the Washi Traditional Crafts Gallery - located at Michi-no-Eki Adachi (Roadside Station) - visitors can make washi postcards, paper fans, and other items.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.michinoeki-adachi.jp/en/#Craft
Contact

Washi Traditional Crafts Gallery - located at Michi-no-Eki Adachi (Roadside Station)

(+81) 243-61-3200

washi-1000@ac.auone-net.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Closed: January 1

ParkingAvailable (Free)
Entrance FeeEntrance is free, but a small fee is charged for each activity.
Related infoFor more information on the craft experiences, contact Nihonmatsu Tourism Association. Please see their website here
Access Details
Access33-1 Kamidaira, Shimokawasaki, Nihonmatsu, Fukushima, 969-1511
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from Koriyama-Higashi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Train: 10 min by taxi from Adachi Station on the JR Ban-etsu East Line.

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