Design Your Own Shirakawa Daruma

Design Your Own Shirakawa Daruma

There are records of Shirakawa Daruma (Japanese traditional dolls) being sold as far back as the feudal reign of the Niwa Domain in 1627. Current Shirakawa Daruma are known as “Shirakawa Tsurugame Shochikubai Daruma.” The faces of these dolls are painted to incorporate various animals and plants, with the eyebrows representing cranes, the mustache representing a turtle, the ears representing pines and plum trees, and the beard representing bamboo or pine trees. All of these images are thought to bring good luck. The daruma is known to be a very classical, lucky talisman, started by Matsudaira Sadanobu, the lord of Shirakawa, when he hired the renowned painter Tani Buncho to paint the now famous face on the daruma doll. Once every year a large Shirakawa Daruma Market is held to celebrate and sell the beloved daruma dolls. You can paint your own daruma at the two daruma workshops in town!

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://shirakawa315.com/eng/index.html
Contact

Shirakawa Tourism & Local Products Association

(+81) 248-22-1147

Best SeasonAll Year
Access Details
Getting there

Watanabe Daruma

  • Address: Hachiryujin 98, Shirakawa City, Fukushima Pref. 961-0907
  • 9 min taxi ride from Shirakawa Station.
  • Opening hours: 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
  • Email address for booking: shirakawa-daruma@basil.ocn.ne.jp
  • Website
  • 600 yen for painting experience.

Sagawa Daruma

  • Address: Yoko-machi 81, Shirakawa City, Fukushima. Pref 961-0907
  • 10 min walk from Shirakawa Station.
  • Email address for booking: s-daruma@guitar.ocn.ne.jp
  • Website (Japanese only)
  • 500 yen to 1200 yen for painting experience.

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The Hashimoto Butsugu-Chokoku Ten (Hashimoto Buddhist Sculpture Shop) has a long history of over 160 years. Here visitors can try the truly unique experience of customizing their own lacquered chopsticks. Under careful instruction, you’ll be able to go home with your very own pair of one-of-a-kind chopsticks. The establishment sells many fine lacquerware products, from kitchen utensils and crockery to masks for use as decoration or at festivals. The chopstick-customizing workshop is available for 2,500 yen per person and is very popular for groups and couples. Even children (ages 12 and up) are able to do it with the supervision of adults and the instruction of the teacher. There are also pamphlets available in English for non-Japanese speakers. The workshop is easy to understand as the instructor guides you through the various steps until you are finally able to see the revealed layers of lacquer color on your own chopsticks. The chopstick experience workshop requires a reservation made at least five days in advance. While you are at the Hashimoto Buddhist Sculpture Shop, you will be guided through the six steps of making your own lacquered chopsticks. It will be an exciting experience as you begin with red or black chopsticks and slowly file down the layers of lacquer until the patterns are revealed. Traditionally, red chopsticks are for women and black are for men. Whichever color you choose though, these are certain to be your favorite set of chopsticks full of memories.  

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