Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

This museum is dedicated to the works of the world-renowned woodblock print artist Kiyoshi Saito. Housing a collection of 850 of his works, including his well-known series 'Aizu no Fuyu (Winter in Aizu)', the museum also holds four special exhibitions a year with about 90 works displayed on each occasion.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.town.yanaizu.fukushima.jp/bijutsu/en/
Contact

Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

(+81) 241-42-3630

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (Last entrance at 4:00 p.m.)

Closed: Mondays (Or the following Tuesday, when Monday is a national holiday)

ParkingAbout 80 cars including coaches (Common parking of the museum and the adjoining Michi-no-Eki Roadside Station)
Accommodation details

Pets: Not allowed

Related infoAdmission fee:

Adult: 510 yen

High school & college student: 300 yen

Primary & junior high school student: 200 yen

Discount rate available for groups of 15 or more
Access Details
Access187 Shimodaira Otsu, Yanaizu, Yanaizu Town, Kawanuma District, Fukushima Pref. 969-7201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 km from Aizu-Bange I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 30 min walk from Aizu-Yanaizu Station on the JR Tadami Line

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