Adachigahara Furusato Village

Adachigahara Furusato Village

Experience traditional Japanese life & culture at Adachigahara Furusato Village. From exploring samurai residences to learning about the lifestyles of local farmers, there is a lot to see and do in this incredibly scenic open-air museum.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.nihonmatsu.lg.jp/page/page002713.html
Contact

bappy@oregano.ocn.ne.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Entrance FeeAdult 200 yen (Senjinkan Museum)
Access Details
AccessAdachigahara 4-100, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from the Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 5 min taxi ride from Nihonmatsu Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

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Ryusenji Temple

Ryusenji Temple is the perfect place to refresh the mind and body during your trip to Fukushima Prefecture. Originally built in 1320, the temple underwent many name changes until being called Ryusenji. The beautiful main hall has not changed for about 300 years after being reconstructed due to a fire in 1758. Nowadays, the temple offers many interesting events and vistas to visitors. There are many sights to experience at Ryusenji. Inside the main hall of the temple, you can see a cloth bag containing the temple’s treasures and a palanquin-shaped box hanging from the ceiling. This important Cultural Property also contains many wooden statues and make for an impressive time amongst history. If you would like a more personal experience at Ryusenji Temple, why not try the Zazen meditation experience offered by the temple’s monks? Zazen is a short zen meditation experience and is offered at Ryusenji Temple on the first Sunday of every month, as well as the first and third Wednesdays of every month. Sit in silence and stillness for 20 minutes while you empty yourself of worldly thoughts and desires. It’s best to contact ahead of time to make reservations if you’d like to experience their Zazen, temple yoga, or calligraphy. The nature surrounding Ryusenji Temple and the calming halls of the temple will welcome you and give you peace of mind and spirit. So shed the busy angst of your life and let Ryusenji Temple offer you a serene experience.

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Bandai-Azuma Lake Line

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

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