Adachigahara Furusato Village

Adachigahara Furusato Village

Experience traditional Japanese life & culture at Adachigahara Furusato Village. From exploring samurai residences to learning about the lifestyles of local farmers, there is a lot to see and do in this incredibly scenic open-air museum.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.nihonmatsu.lg.jp/page/page002713.html
Contact

bappy@oregano.ocn.ne.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Entrance FeeAdult 200 yen (Senjinkan Museum)
Access Details
AccessAdachigahara 4-100, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from the Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 5 min taxi ride from Nihonmatsu Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Iizaka Onsen

Fukushima City's Iizaka Onsen has been used as an onsen town for over 1,000 years, and has been visited by legendary figures in Japanese literature such as Matsuo Basho (1644-1694), the master of haiku poems. Locals in Iizaka Onsen pride themselves on the well-known Japanese phrase “Beppu in the West; Iizaka in the East”, which refers to the best onsen towns in Japan. The Surikami River that passes through the town is lined on either side by 9 high-rise ryokan (Japanese-style inns). More ryokan can be found scattered about Iizaka Onsen. The town is also dotted with a number of communal baths and public foot baths. Some of Iizaka Onsen’s most well-loved local foods include include Enban Gyoza and soft-boiled eggs known as Onsen Tamago. Iizaka Onsen is also close to sightseeing spots such as Hanamomo no Sato, the Fruit Line, and Nakano Fudoson Temple.

The World Glassware Hall
Local Foods

Niida Honke Sake Brewery

Located in the sleepy village of Tamura-machi, and surrounded by sprawling rice fields is the Niida-Honke brewery. Since its founding in 1711, Niida Honke has seen eighteen generations of head brewers, each bringing their own personality and subtle changes to the company and its sake. The current head brewer is Yasuhiko Niida, an incredibly nice person with an awe inspiring passion for making Sake. Under Mr. Niida’s supervision, Niida Honke has seen many changes. In 2011 the brewery celebrated its 300th anniversary and the achievement of using 100% natural rice in its brewing process. Unfortunately, this was the same year as the Great East Japan Earthquake and the following nuclear disaster. Despite the difficulties, Niida Honke worked hard to return the health of the rice fields. After the fields were cleaned and returned to their healthy status, a decision was made to move the company into a more sustainable and natural direction with the goal of creating its sake with 100% natural and organic ingredients. They currently grow much of the rice used to create their sake in the fields that surround the brewery. Working with local farmers to create healthy, high quality rice that is grown without the use of pesticides or harmful chemicals. In the future Niida Honke aims to brew all of its sake in natural wooden tanks, switch entirely to solar power, and grow 100% of its own rice. For each bottle that you buy, Niida Honke takes one step closer to these goals. Read more about the sake brewing process at Niida Honke!

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

<p>Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge. Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.</p>

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