Adachigahara Furusato Village

Adachigahara Furusato Village

Experience traditional Japanese life & culture at Adachigahara Furusato Village. From exploring samurai residences to learning about the lifestyles of local farmers, there is a lot to see and do in this incredibly scenic open-air museum.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.nihonmatsu.lg.jp/page/page002713.html
Contact

bappy@oregano.ocn.ne.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Entrance FeeAdult 200 yen (Senjinkan Museum)
Access Details
AccessAdachigahara 4-100, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from the Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 5 min taxi ride from Nihonmatsu Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Koshidai no Sakura (The Koshidai Cherry Tree)

This huge Japanese cherry tree is over 400 years old and has been designated as a national Natural Treasure. The tree has a trunk circumference of about 7.2 meters and stands 20 meters high, and was thus selected as one of the "100 Giants of the Forest" by Japan's Forestry Agency. Koshidai Cherry Blossom Festival is held every year on May 3. A Yabusame horseback archery event accompanied by taiko drumming takes place during this festival, and local organizations set up food stalls. Photo tip: Try taking photos from the south side of cherry blossoms.

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Takayu Onsen

This famous hot spring area is located at an altitude of approximately 750 meters, which is why it’s called 'taka-yu' ('taka' means 'high-up' and 'yu' means 'hot spring'). Located on the slopes of the Azuma mountain range, Takayu Onsen area was once known as “Shinobu Takayu” and, together with Zao Takayu and Shirabu Takayu, prospered as one of three Takayu in what was once known as the northern Ou region. The waters of Takayu Onsen are a bluish milky color and are thought to have healing properties. Most of the resort facilities of the area neither add water nor adjust the temperature in order to maintain the natural allure of the hot spring waters. After bathing in the waters of this spring, your skin becomes almost slippery from the high acidic and hydrogen sulfide makeup. In the Takayu Onsen area, there are 10 natural hot spring sources, with names such as 'Takinoyu', 'Netsuyu', and 'Senkinoyu'. These sources are named after old public baths. In the olden days, bathtubs were built right next to or directly above the hot spring source. Today, the bathing facilities still receive their water flowing directly from the same source. Nowadays, Takayu Onsen consists of about a dozen ryokan (traditional Japanese inns), all offering their unique charm to travelers. You’ll be pleased to note that many of the ryokan open their hot spring baths to non-staying guests for a small fee. The most famous hot spring facility in Takayu Onsen is Tamagoyu, a wooden bathhouse with a traditional feel. There’s even a foot bath in the center of the town open to the public. If public bathing isn’t something you feel comfortable with, many of the onsen facilities in the area also offer private onsen rooms with a rotenburo (open-air bath) available for your own use. It is a relaxing experience unlike any other to soak in the hot waters and feel your worries melt away.

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Okitsushima Shrine
Historical Sites

Okitsushima Shrine

Off the beaten track, Mt. Kohata’s Okitsushima Shrine is a perfect spot for those searching for a peaceful, spiritual place to visit. The shrine’s story – Date Masamune burned down Mt. Kohata in order to dominate the area during the Tensho Era (1563-1593), but couldn’t destroy the shrine’s three-storied pagoda – makes the area even more special. The three main goddesses of Shintoism – whose names are Princess Tagori, Princess Tagitsu, Princess Ichikishima – are worshipped at this shrine. These three goddesses are thought to be the daughters of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the major deity in the Shinto religion. It is not only Shintoism which is practiced at this shrine, but also Buddhism. In particular, the Japanese Buddhist goddess known as ‘Benten sama’ is worshipped on Mt. Kohata. Despite the turmoil which engulfed faith in Buddhism which occurred during the Meiji Era, strong faith in Benten sama – the Buddhist deity of peace, good luck, wisdom, and marriage – continues to this very day. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata.

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple
Historical Sites

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

Ryusenji Temple
Historical Sites

Ryusenji Temple

Ryusenji Temple is the perfect place to refresh the mind and body during your trip to Fukushima Prefecture. Originally built in 1320, the temple underwent many name changes until being called Ryusenji. The beautiful main hall has not changed for about 300 years after being reconstructed due to a fire in 1758. Nowadays, the temple offers many interesting events and vistas to visitors. There are many sights to experience at Ryusenji. Inside the main hall of the temple, you can see a cloth bag containing the temple’s treasures and a palanquin-shaped box hanging from the ceiling. This important Cultural Property also contains many wooden statues and make for an impressive time amongst history. If you would like a more personal experience at Ryusenji Temple, why not try the Zazen meditation experience offered by the temple’s monks? Zazen is a short zen meditation experience and is offered at Ryusenji Temple on the first Sunday of every month, as well as the first and third Wednesdays of every month. Sit in silence and stillness for 20 minutes while you empty yourself of worldly thoughts and desires. It’s best to contact ahead of time to make reservations if you’d like to experience their Zazen, temple yoga, or calligraphy. The nature surrounding Ryusenji Temple and the calming halls of the temple will welcome you and give you peace of mind and spirit. So shed the busy angst of your life and let Ryusenji Temple offer you a serene experience.

Kyu Horikiri-tei
Historical Sites

Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house. There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

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