Okitsushima Shrine

Okitsushima Shrine

Off the beaten track, Mt. Kohata’s Okitsushima Shrine is a perfect spot for those searching for a peaceful, spiritual place to visit. The shrine’s story – Date Masamune burned down Mt. Kohata in order to dominate the area during the Tensho Era (1563-1593), but couldn’t destroy the shrine’s three-storied pagoda – makes the area even more special.

The three main goddesses of Shintoism – whose names are Princess Tagori, Princess Tagitsu, Princess Ichikishima – are worshipped at this shrine. These three goddesses are thought to be the daughters of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the major deity in the Shinto religion.

It is not only Shintoism which is practiced at this shrine, but also Buddhism. In particular, the Japanese Buddhist goddess known as ‘Benten sama’ is worshipped on Mt. Kohata. Despite the turmoil which engulfed faith in Buddhism which occurred during the Meiji Era, strong faith in Benten sama – the Buddhist deity of peace, good luck, wisdom, and marriage – continues to this very day.

Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://okitushima.com/(Japanese)
Best SeasonAll Year
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessKohata Ujike 49, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 964-0203
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min drive from the Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Train: From Nihonmatsu Station (on the JR Tohoku Main Line), take a bus heading for Kohata (木幡) for 45 min. Get off outside Kohata Daiichi Shogakko (木幡第一小学校), and from there walk 20 minutes.
Alternatively, take a taxi for 35 min from JR Adachi Station (JR Tohoku Main Line).

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