Hanamomo-no-Sato Park

Hanamomo-no-Sato Park

From early April right up to the start of May, 40 varieties of blossoming peach trees present a feast for the eyes for visitors to Hanamomo-no-Sato Park. There are over 300 peach trees spread across the 8,000 square meters of land.

From blossoms with a single layer of petals, to the elaborate Yae-zakura and Kikuzaki Sakura flowers, there is a huge variety in the shapes and colours of cherry blossoms to be discovered and enjoyed at Hanamomo-no-Sato Park.

As well as being free to visit, Hanamomo-no-Sato Park is conveniently located; just 20 minutes on foot from Iizaka Onsen Station.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://fukushima-guide.jp/discover/hanamomo-no-sato/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

fukushima.guide@f-kankou.jp

Best Season
  • Spring
Entrance FeeFree entrance
Related infoBest Season: Early-April to Early-May
Access Details
AccessHigashidateshita, Iizaka Town, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-0201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from the Fukushima Iizaka I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Train: Take the Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line from Fukushima Station. Get off at Iizaka Onsen Station. From there, the park is a 20 min walk.

By Taxi: 25 min taxi-ride from Fukushima Station.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house. There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

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Koori Town's Peach Blossoms
Nature & Scenery

Koori Town's Peach Blossoms

Koori Town, home to some 236 acres of peach orchards, is a wonderful place to view peach blossoms when spring rolls around. 24,000 trees fill the 120 hectares of peach orchards located along the banks of the Abukuma in Koori Town's Danzaki area - many of these are located along a road known locally as 'the Peach Line'. When these flowers all open their petals in unison, the landscape is transformed into a sea of pink, truly a utopian vista. Their Majesties the Emperor and Empress (the Crown Prince and Princess at the time) walked through this orchard on April 26 1996 - an event which is commemorated with a memorial tablet that stands along the Peach Line. Visitors to the peach orchards on the banks of the Abukuma river will be treated to views of Mt. Handa, the symbol of Koori Town. The best time to visit the peach orchards is mid-April.

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)
Nature & Scenery

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

Miharu Takizakura
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

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