Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge. Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.nishigo-kankou.jp/nature(Japanese)
Contact

Nishigo Village Tourism Association

Best Season
  • Autumn
Access Details
Getting there

By Car: 20 km (30 min) away from JR Shin-Shirakawa Sta. on National Route 289.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Okitsushima Shrine

Off the beaten track, Mt. Kohata’s Okitsushima Shrine is a perfect spot for those searching for a peaceful, spiritual place to visit. The shrine’s story – Date Masamune burned down Mt. Kohata in order to dominate the area during the Tensho Era (1563-1593), but couldn’t destroy the shrine’s three-storied pagoda – makes the area even more special. The three main goddesses of Shintoism – whose names are Princess Tagori, Princess Tagitsu, Princess Ichikishima – are worshipped at this shrine. These three goddesses are thought to be the daughters of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the major deity in the Shinto religion. It is not only Shintoism which is practiced at this shrine, but also Buddhism. In particular, the Japanese Buddhist goddess known as ‘Benten sama’ is worshipped on Mt. Kohata. Despite the turmoil which engulfed faith in Buddhism which occurred during the Meiji Era, strong faith in Benten sama – the Buddhist deity of peace, good luck, wisdom, and marriage – continues to this very day. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

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Miharu Takizakura
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

Sukagawa Botan-en Peony Garden
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Sukagawa Botan-en Peony Garden

This peony garden is three times the size of Tokyo Dome, and has 290 varieties of peony, totalling 7,000 flowers. Key features of Sukagawa Botan-en Peony Garden include its 200 year-old peony plants, the 'Showa-no-yume' variety of peony unique to Sukagawa City, and a rare 'Toryo' Chinese peony presented by a representative from Luoyang, Sukagawa's sister-city in China. The deep purple of the Japanese peonies that grow in the garden are also very popular. Volunteer guides are ready to show visitors around the park for not extra charge. The Sukagawa Peony Garden is the only such garden in Japan to be designated as a Spot of Natural Beauty by the Japanese government. As well as peonies, the garden also boasts flowers such as roses, and Japanese irises, which are in bloom until the end of June. Peak viewing season for peonies is from late April to mid-May.  

Nanko Park
Nature & Scenery

Nanko Park

In 1801, Matsudaira Sadanobu, the twelfth Lord of Shirakawa, constructed a recreational area which was to be opened to anybody - regardless of status or family background. This recreational area turned into Nanko Park, which is considered to be the Japan's oldest public park. There are Yoshino cherry blossoms (about 800 trees), azaleas, pine trees, and maple trees at the edge of lake. You can enjoy seasonal scenery such as cherry blossoms in spring, fresh green leaves in early summer, autumn colors, and winter scenery with the beautiful contrast of the Nasu Mountains. The park contains Nanko Shrine, where Sadanobu is enshrined as a deity. Next to Nanko Shrine stands the beautiful Japanese gardens Suirakuen. At Suirakuen, visitors can try traditional Japanese tea served in a tea room, which boasts a spectacular view of the gardens. There are a number of shops, cafés, and restaurants along the edge of Lake Nanko. One of the local specialities to look out for is nanko dango, which are sticky rice balls on a skewer, served with different toppings.

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