Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge

Nishigo Village is truly blessed with breathtaking scenery and view spots, such as Kashi-Ohashi Bridge.

Kashi-Ohashi Bridge stretches for 199 m against a backdrop of mountains, colored with fresh spring greenery or bright red leaves, depending on the season. Home to the water source of the Abukuma River, and filled with primeval forest trees, the beauty of Nishigo Village area was even praised by the feudal lord Matsudaira Sadanobu in centuries gone by. A bridle path has been constructed near Kashi-Ohashi Bridge, and lots of hikers come to visit every summer and autumn.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.nishigo-kankou.jp/nature(Japanese)
Contact

Nishigo Village Tourism Association

Best Season
  • Autumn
Access Details
Getting there

By Car: 20 km (30 min) away from JR Shin-Shirakawa Sta. on National Route 289.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Futamata Onsen

Outdoor hot spring baths line the sides of the valley at the foot of Mt. Futamata. The open-air baths of Futamata Onsen’s ryokan are situated in a very peaceful location, surrounded by ancient forests full of beech trees – all at an altitude of 800 m. Futamata Onsen’s hot spring baths have been used for about 1200 years, and are particularly revered for the hot spring water’s healing properties. What’s more, being close to Ouch-juku, Futamata Onsen is conveniently located for a visit during your trip to Fukushima.

The World Glassware Hall
Gourmet & Shopping

Kunitaya Miso Factory

The Kunitaya Miso Factory is a small shop that was founded in 1777 to produce miso paste for the local community. Miso is one of the most (if not the most) popular flavor for foods in Japan. Many people drink miso flavored soup at least once a day and it isn’t uncommon to find miso soup present in every meal of the day. Before grocery stores and convenience stores were as widespread as they are today, people would go to their neighborhood miso shops to source this kitchen staple Today, many of these small shops have disappeared, however at Kunitaya Miso Factory, the owners want to preserve their small business and the unique culture of small batch local miso makers.The small scale operation allows for more freedom and diversity in flavors. At the café next door, “Kura Café,” you can try different variations and flavors of the miso that they produce at the Kunitaya Miso Factory.The brewery is housed in an old fashioned Japanese ware-house style building with a red lattice front. Years ago, during festivals, the red lattice front was removed to make the building more open to the street and the public. If you are interested in getting a more in depth experience, consider joining a tour of the brewery! Contact us if you are interested.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum

Traditional structures from northern Fukushima built between the Mid-Edo to Meiji era (1700 – 1912) – including restaurants, private houses, storehouses, and even a theater – have been relocated to Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum.At Minka-en these buildings are restored and displayed to the public, along with a range of artefacts and tools used in daily life in years gone by.Also, a number of special events, such as sword-smithing demonstrations, are held every year to celebrate and promote traditional folk crafts and skills.

You might also like

Miharu Takizakura
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument.Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture).Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated.Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

Top