Miharu Takizakura

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument.

Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture).

Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated.

Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://miharukoma.com/experience/183(Automated translation available)
Contact

Miharu Tourism Association

(+81) 247-62-3690

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingLarge parking lot available (Up to 850 vehicles)
Entrance FeeDuring cherry blossom season: 300 yen for adults (Free for junior high school students and younger)
Accommodation details

Pets: Allowed

Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Mid to Late April
Access Details
AccessSakurakubo, Taki, Miharu Town, Tamura District, Fukushima Pref. 963-7714
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 7.3 km from Funehiki-Miharu I.C. /12.6 km from Koriyama-Higashi I.C. on the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 6.3 km from Miharu Station on the Ban-etsu East Line

Expect traffic jams during the cherry blossom season. During the cherry blossom season, sightseeing shuttle buses run from Miharu station.

Useful Links

Reaching Miharu Takizakura

Japan's Oldest Waterfall Sakura

Fukushima's Top Cherry Blossom Spots

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Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

A traditional craftsmen's village bestowing an air of the olde-worlde. The papier-mâché crafts of the town, made lovingly by hand for generations, will bring a smile to your face. Takashiba Dekoyashiki is an historical craftsmen's village, and was at one time under the protection of the Miharu feudal domain. Dating back 300 years to the Edo Period, this community is said to have been born when a traveller from Kyoto taught the people how to craft papier-mâché dolls using a special paint called 'nikawa'. Take a walk through the nikawa-scented streets of Takashiba Dekoyashiki and step into the Japan of old. Visitors can try their hand at painting various traditional crafts, including the Miharu-koma horse wooden doll.

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