Mt. Azuma-Kofuji

Mt. Azuma-Kofuji

Every year in spring, as the snow melts away, it leaves behind the shape of a giant white rabbit on the side of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. This is called the “seeding rabbit”, and it signals to the people of Fukushima that the farming season has come.

From April to November each year, you can experience the beauty of the awe-inspiring natural landscape of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji.

Mt. Azuma-Kofuji is an active volcano with an appealing symmetry to it and a soft conical shape; because of these classic features, it was named Kofuji ('little Fuji'), after the iconic Japanese mountain.

Thanks to its volcanic ground, the area has given birth to many nearby onsen areas perfect for relaxing, such as Tsuchiyu Onsen and Takayu Onsen.

Mt. Azuma-Kofuji is a great destination for those who decide to drive through the area as the Bandai-Azuma Skyline happens to pass just below the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. 

Along the roadway is the Jododaira Visitor Center, which offers visitors a place to park, rest up, get a snack, and maybe even buy souvenirs. It is the perfect spot to take a break and explore one of the many short hiking routes to stretch out your muscles after a long car ride. From there, it is just a short hike up to the crater, and there are plenty of other great trails. 

Circle the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji on a relaxed 40-minute walk and—if you are lucky—enjoy gorgeous views of Fukushima City, Mt. Bandai, and the Urabandai area. But do watch your step as the ground can be uneven and even slippery on grey days. The mountain is open from spring to autumn every year.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.f-kankou.jp/en/experience/trip-ideas/553/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

Entry is not possible from November to April, as the road leading up to Mt. Azuma-Kofuji is closed during the winter months.

ParkingAvailable (Jododaira Rest House's Parking Lot)
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessTsuchiyu Onsen-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-2151
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 1 hour drive from the Fukushima-Nishi I.C. exit off the Tohoku  Expressway

Useful Links

Azuma-Kofuji’s Short & Scenic Hiking Route

Bandai-Azuma Skyline

Jododaira Visitor Center

Related trips

  1. Driving

    Ultimate Fukushima Prefecture Road Trip

    This trip highlights some of the best Fukushima has to offer and is perfect for those looking to get the most out of the prefecture in a limited time. Take in castles, nature, traditional villages, and more as you treat yourself to local styles of soba and ramen along the way. Renting a car is a must if you want to hit all the spots on this tour. You can take it slow and complete this trip over three days, or skip out an overnight stay in Urabandai area, and do it in two days. Start the day from Fukushima Station with a scenic drive to the the beautiful Urabandai region. We recommend taking the Bandai-Azuma Skyline road so that you can enjoy a mountain drive and check out the great sights at Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. From there, take the stunning sightseeing road Azuma-Bandai Lake Line into Urabandai. Explore the Urabandai area, have lunch, go on a walk around the five-colored ponds of Goshiki-numa, and maybe even take a dip in a hot spring or two. Choose whether take it slow and stay the night in Urabandai area, or whether to press on to Aizu-Wakamatsu City.  Later that day - or the next morning, depending on your schedule - head into the castle town of Aizu-Wakamatsu City where samurai culture is prevalent. The majestic Tsurugajo Castle offers beautiful views of the surroundings from the keep. Check out the nearby Tsurugajo Kaikan to paint an akabeko or two and maybe have some lunch. Then explore the mysterious Sazaedo Temple and the surrounding Mt. Iimoriyama area. From here, we suggest staying overnight in the city. There are plenty of budget hotels in Aizu-Wakamatsu, but if you are looking for something traditionally Japanese, we recommend looking into lodging at the nearby Higashiyama Onsen hot springs town just east of the city. On the next day prepare to jump into the past with a trip to the Ouchi-juku mountain village. You can spend hours here shopping and eating local foods while walking up and down the street lined with traditional thatched-roof houses. Lastly, head to the To-no-Hetsuri Crags, a natural monument filled with towering cliffs overlooking the Okawa River. Cross the nearby suspension bridge which offers breathtaking views of the surroundings. After getting fully refreshed head back to Shin-Shirakawa station by car, drop off your rental car, and connect back to Tokyo or the next stop on your journey!

    Ultimate Fukushima Prefecture Road Trip

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