Mitsuya District Warehouses & Climbing Kiln

Mitsuya District Warehouses & Climbing Kiln


Be transported back to the elegant Taisho Period at Kitakata’s Mitsuya District. Kitakata is famous as being a town of charming red brick kura (Japanese warehouses). The rich texture and distinctive color of the warehouse bricks are an integral part of Kitakata’s townscape.

In the year Meiji 23 (1890), the connecting kilns of Mitsuya District were opened. As well as roof tiles, bricks made here were also painted a deep red color, giving the area a unique atmosphere and classic scenery. The area was registered as an Industrial Modernization Heritage Site by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry.

The large red brick climbing kiln, located inside the Wakana Family's home, is truly a sight to behold. This district has even been written about on the Michelin Travel website.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/contact/(Japanese)
Contact

Kitakata Tourism & Local Products Association (+81) 241-24-5200

(+81) 241-24-5200

http://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/contact/

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Entrance Fee200 yen to enter the Wakana Family warehouse
Access Details
AccessClimbing Kiln of Mitsuya (House of the Wakana Family), Hitsukezawa-3567-2, Iwatsuki-machi, Miyatsu, Kitakata City, Fukushima Pref. 966-0002
View directions
Getting there

By Car:

  • 25 min drive from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train:

  • 20 min by taxi from Kitakata Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)
  • 40 min by rental-cycle from Kitakata Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

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Urabandai Highlands

The Urabandai highlands of northern Fukushima Prefecture, are situated at an altitude of 800 meters and surrounded by Mt. Bandai, Mt. Adatara, and Mt. Azuma. The highlands were created by Mt. Bandai erupting in 1888. Urabandai is part of Bandai Asahi National Park and offers a variety of seasonal attractions. Cool weather in summer and deep snow in winter make Urabandai a perfect place for both indoor and outdoor enjoyment. About 300 lakes and ponds, including the Goshiki-numa Ponds and Lake Hibara, are scattered across Urabandai. The harmonious beauty of nature created by the abundant woodlands and lakes will certainly touch the hearts of all visitors.

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