Byobuiwa Crags

Byobuiwa Crags

The Byobuiwa Crags (屏風岩) are a rock formation in Minamiaizu, in the Southern area of Fukushima Prefecture. The rocks have eroded through many years to their current shape. The crags are light in color, offering an interesting contrast with the blue of the gushing Ina river, and the vibrant colors of the surrounding foliage, creating a scenery that becomes particularly poignant during the autumn. Visitors can stroll the walking course around the crags, which takes approximately 20 minutes to be completed and includes several interesting picture spots.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.kanko-aizu.com/miru/25053/
Contact

Minamiaizu Tourism & Local Products Association
(+81) 241-62-3000

Best SeasonAll Year
Related infoBest season: May to November

Autumn foliage viewing season: Mid-October to early November (varies each year)
Access Details
AccessHirasawa area, Omomo, Minamiaizu Town, Fukushima Pref. 967-0515
View directions
Getting there

By train and bus: 1 hour by local bus No. 40 ‘Oze-Numayama Pass’ from the Aizukogen Ozeguchi Station (Tobu Revaty Aizu/ Aizu Tetsudo).

By car: Approx. 4 hours from Tokyo on the Tohoku Expressway and the National Road No. 400. Approx. 2 hours 35 minutes from Koriyama Station via National Road No. 118.

Useful Links

Oze National Park

Hinoemata Kabuki

Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses

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Ozegahara Marsh

Ozegahara Marsh is a high-altitude marshland located in Oze National Park. This 8 square kilometer marshland is a popular hiking destination and is home to some rare plants, including white skunk cabbage, Nikko Kisuge, and Watasuge (a variant of cottongrass). Hiking trails at Ozegahara are well-maintained and used almost year-round for hikers, except in winter when the park is often closed due to snow. Being just 150 kilometers from Tokyo makes Ozegahara and the rest of Oze National Park a popular getaway from city life. Some people will even drive up early in the morning, hike the day away, and then return to Tokyo the same day. It’s admittedly a tough trip if you choose to do it all in one day. Instead, why not stay the night in one of the overnight lodgings and huts within the park grounds? There's also the option of staying at a minshuku (private homes that provide meals and lodging for tourists) in Hinoemata Onsen town. However you choose to travel to Ozegahara, you won’t be disappointed. The marshland has hundreds of small pools that are a beauty to admire. Two mountains, Shibutsusan and Mt. Hiuchigatake, almost seem to stand guard over those who admire the lovely marshland scenery. The most popular trail to hike is the Hatomachitoge, as it is only a one-hour walk from the western end of the marshland. Visit in late May to early June to enjoy the famous white skunk cabbages as they bloom across Ozegahara. In July and August, the marshlands are painted a gentle yellow by the Nikko Kisuge flowers. And in September and October, the autumn colors bathe the marshland in bright gold and crimson.

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Nature & Scenery

Oze National Park

Oze is home to a plethora of beautiful flowers. These include the Asian skunk cabbage that blossoms in the marshes as the snow melts, and the bright yellow of the Nikko Kisuge, which is reflected in the marshes just when the surrounding mountains become green. The nature of Oze is symbolized by its beautiful flowers, and together with the mountains, lakes, marshes, rivers, forests, and wildlife that lives in this region, create a stunning sight. Chozo Hirano opened up the area around 100 years ago, and because of the protection of its magnificent nature up until now, Oze has become a symbol of nature conservation in Japan. The beautiful nature of Oze presents a different face throughout the seasons, and all continue to charm us. Key points of the sightseeing spot/ recommended points for tours:  In order to both preserve the precious nature of Oze, and to be able to come face-to-face with its splendor, we recommend that you visit on weekdays, and take your time to encounter the nature of Oze. Oze has the Ozenuma Visitor Center and the Oze-Yamanohana Visitor Center as locations from which you can both appreciate Oze's nature, and learn about the environment. At the visitor center, you can learn from displays that explain in an easy-to-understand the formation of the nature in Oze, points to see, and the most up-to-date information about the natural environment. This lets you more fully enjoy the appeal of the nature of Oze.Visits are even more enjoyable when you know more; therefore we recommend visits with a guide who can tell you more about the nature and charm of Oze. We urge visitors to make use of the certified guides who have a wealth of knowledge about Oze's nature, culture, and history, and who can ensure your visit is safe.

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Tenkyodai Showa-no-Mori Park

Tenkyodai Showa-no-Mori Park (天鏡台・昭和の森公園) is a wide plateau close to Mount Bandai in Inawashiro Town, famous for its impressive views of Lake Inawashiro surrounded by lush greenery. East Asian and Somei Yoshino cherry blossom trees bloom spectacularly, typically from early to mid May, against the backdrop of the mountains. During autumn, the rows of colorful red and orange trees make for an unmissable sight. Visitors can follow the strolling paths and enjoy 30 or 60 minute hikes.From the viewing platform, don’t miss the incredible sights of lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai.Best season for sakura viewing (previous years): Early to Mid-May (dates vary each year).Please note that the park closes during winter (approximately from December until mid-April).

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Lake Inawashiro

Japan's fourth-largest freshwater lake, Lake Inawashiro is situated in Bandai Asahi National Park. It is also known as the “Heavenly Mirror Lake” and has a surface area of 104 square kilometers! The combination of Lake Inawashiro and Mt. Bandai form one of Aizu's representative landscapes. And being less than three hours from Tokyo by shinkansen and local train means that you have easy access from a major transport hub.The lake offers year-round fun. Enjoy cherry blossoms in spring at Iwahashi Shrine, one of Aizu’s five famous cherry trees. Summer at Lake Inawashiro is slightly cooler than the rest of Fukushima, so take advantage of camping by the lakeshore, and a wide variety of marine sports. Colored leaves and hikes are the popular thing to do in autumn, view the fiery hues and take in the crisp air. In winter, visitors can enjoy fresh powder snow and winter thrills in the form of skiing and snowboarding; and you can even catch a glimpse of migrating swans on the shores.It’s truly a beauty no matter when you decide to visit. There are also a wide range of scenic spots from where visitors can take photographs and soak in the view. It’s a great place to escape from the stress of work and life or just to experience Japanese nature and landscapes.Lake Inawashiro's size means that it is accessible from a number of sightseeing spots, including Tenkyokaku stately house and Hideo Noguchi Memorial Museum (a museum dedicated to the life and work of a Japanese scientist famous for his research on yellow fever). There’s plenty more to do nearby: view some amazing works by international artists at the Morohashi Museum of Modern Art, or visit the rainbow-colored Goshiki-numa Ponds.

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