Kyu Kai Honke Kurazashiki

Kyu Kai Honke Kurazashiki

Many storehouses have been built in Kitakata City over the years, with various architectural styles represented across the city. The Kyu Kai Honke Kurazashiki (Former Residence of the Kai Family) is among the storehouses that are often visited by tourists. The outer walls have been coated with black laquer. The interior has been constructed lavishly with precious wood, giving the building a dignified appearance.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.kitakata-kanko.jp/category/detail.php?id=3(Automated translation available)
Contact

(+81) 241-22-0001

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open all year

ParkingUp to 20 cars
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessAza 1-4611, Kitakata City, Fukushima Pref. 966-0819
View directions
Getting there

By Train: 25 min walk from Kitakata Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

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