Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai.

One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century.

Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer.

It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.city.motomiya.lg.jp/site/kanko/miru.html(Automatic translation)
Contact

Mt. Iwatsuno

http://iwatsunosan.com/inquiry/

Best SeasonAll Year
Estimated Visit Time1h 15m
Opening Hours

Open all year

Entrance FeeFree to visit
Related info A festival is held at Mt. Iwatsuno during the new year holidays.
Access Details
AccessHigashiyaguchi 84, Wada, Motomiya City, Fukushima Pref. 969-1205
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Motomiya I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Train: 15 min by taxi from Motomiya Sta. (JR Tohoku Main Line).

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house. There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Futamata Onsen

Outdoor hot spring baths line the sides of the valley at the foot of Mt. Futamata. The open-air baths of Futamata Onsen’s ryokan are situated in a very peaceful location, surrounded by ancient forests full of beech trees – all at an altitude of 800 m. Futamata Onsen’s hot spring baths have been used for about 1200 years, and are particularly revered for the hot spring water’s healing properties. What’s more, being close to Ouch-juku, Futamata Onsen is conveniently located for a visit during your trip to Fukushima.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Nanko Park

In 1801, Matsudaira Sadanobu, the twelfth Lord of Shirakawa, constructed a recreational area which was to be opened to anybody - regardless of status or family background. This recreational area turned into Nanko Park, which is considered to be the Japan's oldest public park. There are Yoshino cherry blossoms (about 800 trees), azaleas, pine trees, and maple trees at the edge of lake. You can enjoy seasonal scenery such as cherry blossoms in spring, fresh green leaves in early summer, autumn colors, and winter scenery with the beautiful contrast of the Nasu Mountains. The park contains Nanko Shrine, where Sadanobu is enshrined as a deity. Next to Nanko Shrine stands the beautiful Japanese gardens Suirakuen. At Suirakuen, visitors can try traditional Japanese tea served in a tea room, which boasts a spectacular view of the gardens. There are a number of shops, cafés, and restaurants along the edge of Lake Nanko. One of the local specialities to look out for is nanko dango, which are sticky rice balls on a skewer, served with different toppings.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Nakano Fudoson Temple

Nakano Fudoson is a Zen Buddhist temple built around a waterfall. Nakano Fudoson Temple is dedicated to the Buddhist deity Acala (Fudo in Japanese), one of the Buddhist ‘Kings of Knowledge’. Three forms of this deity can be praised at different areas within this temple. Those hoping to ward off evil & bad luck can worship the deity at the main temple. Those looking to protect their eyesight in the coming year can pray at the Kitoden. Those wanting to worship the Fudo deity even more intimately can do so at the Okunoin cave complex, which contains 36 Buddhist statues.

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Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house. There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple
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Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

Komine Castle
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Komine Castle

Shirakawa Castle (Komine Castle) was heavily damaged during the Boshin War (also known as the Meiji Restoration), and was restored in the 1990s. Komine Castle's restoration marked the first time in over 120 years that a restoration had been attempted on a triple turret (yagura) structure. Blueprints from the late Edo Period were used as references for the repair of this structure. As a result of using these blueprints, it was possible to restore the castle almost exclusively using wood construction techniques. This amazing architecture, along with the extraordinary techniques used to make the stone wall around the castle, make this castle extremely special. There is also an exhibition hall on site.

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