Yukiwari Bridge

Yukiwari Bridge

This arched iron bridge crossing the Abukuma River is famous as a viewing point for the fresh green of early summer and brightly colored autumn leaves. The bridge is 81 meters long, and has a maximum height of 50 meters from the valley bottom, and you can enjoy the refreshing feeling of being totally enveloped in the surrounding scenery as you look down from the bridge.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://nishigo-kankou.jp/shizen/index.html(Japanese)
Contact

Nishigo Village Tourism Association

(+81)-248-25-5795

Best Season
  • Autumn
  • Winter
Related infoBest time to see the autumn leaves: Late Oct. to early Nov.

Please note, a new bridge is being constructed adjacent to Yukiwari Bridge, meaning that visitors will be able to see the old and new bridge together.
Access Details
AccessYuigahara 499, Tsuryu, Nishigo Village, Nishishirakawa District, Fukushima Pref. 961-8081
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 25 min drive from the Shirakawa I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 25 min by taxi from Shin-Shirakawa Station on the JR Tohoku Shinkansen Line

Nearby

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Nature & Scenery

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line

Bandai-Azuma Lake Line is a sightseeing road that runs for 13.1 km, connecting Inawashiro Town and Kitashiobara Village. Outstanding backdrops of hundreds of lakes, including Lake Akimoto, Lake Onogawa, and Lake Hibara can be seen from along the road. The Nakatsugawa Valley, which lies half-way along the route, offers a wonderful view of a combination of rock surfaces polished by strong water currents and woodland greenery. A rest-house area with washrooms stands near the valley and visitors can enjoy trekking along the walking trails from the season of fresh green leaves through to the end of the season of red and yellow foliage. The valley is particularly famous as one of the most scenic foliage-viewing spots in Japan with many photographers visiting from both inside and outside of the prefecture. Enjoy a beautiful drive through this landscape when the new leaves of spring are fresh and green or when the autumn beauty of the valley glistens with red and yellow foliage of beeches, buckeyes, and maples.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Nakano Fudoson Temple

Nakano Fudoson is a Zen Buddhist temple built around a waterfall. Nakano Fudoson Temple is dedicated to the Buddhist deity Acala (Fudo in Japanese), one of the Buddhist ‘Kings of Knowledge’. Three forms of this deity can be praised at different areas within this temple. Those hoping to ward off evil & bad luck can worship the deity at the main temple. Those looking to protect their eyesight in the coming year can pray at the Kitoden. Those wanting to worship the Fudo deity even more intimately can do so at the Okunoin cave complex, which contains 36 Buddhist statues.

The World Glassware Hall
Local Foods

Tamakiya Bakery

<p style="text-align:justify">A wonderful family owned and operated small business that sell unique ultraman and kaijyu stylized bread and cookies.</p><p style="text-align:justify">The interior is decorated with Ultraman related memorabilia. This is a family owned and operated small business, and the creativity of the (now adult) kids of the family shines through in the various Ultraman and Kaijyu related breads and cookies!</p><p style="text-align:justify">Each one is absolutely delicious.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai. One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century. Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer. It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

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