Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

A traditional craftsmen's village bestowing an air of the olde-worlde. The papier-mâché crafts of the town, made lovingly by hand for generations, will bring a smile to your face.

Takashiba Dekoyashiki is an historical craftsmen's village, and was at one time under the protection of the Miharu feudal domain. Dating back 300 years to the Edo Period, this community is said to have been born when a traveller from Kyoto taught the people how to craft papier-mâché dolls using a special paint called 'nikawa'. Take a walk through the nikawa-scented streets of Takashiba Dekoyashiki and step into the Japan of old. Visitors can try their hand at painting various traditional crafts, including the Miharu-koma horse wooden doll.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.kanko-koriyama.gr.jp/tourism/detail3-0-66.html(Automated translation available)
Contact

Koriyama City Tourism Association

(+81) 24-924-2621

info@kanko-koriyama.gr.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable (Approx. 100 cars)
Entrance FeeEntrance is free. There are charges for the various painting experiences.
Access Details
AccessNishita-machi, Takashiba District, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref. 963-0902
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min from Koriyama-Higashi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 10 min taxi ride from Miharu Station on the JR Ban-etsu East Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Gourmet & Shopping

Himonoya Sake Brewery

Fukushima’s sake is renowned across Japan, and Nihonmatsu is known in particular as a region with great sake production and high-grade sake producers. Using water from Mt. Adatara, the sake of the area is characterized by a mellow taste and is popular with sake lovers around the world. Himonoya Sake Brewery was established in 1874 and specializes in Senkonari sake; Senkonari is named after the battle standard "Sennari Hyotan (1000 Gourds)" of Toyotomi Hideyoshi, the famous military leader and one of the great unifiers of Japan.The sake at Himonoya is a local secret that many outsiders, even Japanese, don’t know about. To get real sake-brewing experience to be sure to visit in the winter on a morning when the sake brewing art begins and most of the day’s tasks are performed. Because Himonoya Sake Brewery operates in a traditional and artisanal manner, it only makes sake during the winter season (a centuries-old rule). The tours and sake tasting offered at this old-fashioned brewery are available by reservation and are a treat to anyone with a taste for Japanese sake, or Nihonshu. These sake brewery tours are free for groups of one to ten people and take only 30 minutes to experience the brewing process. Guests should be legal Japanese drinking age, 20 years old or more, in order to enjoy the free tasting. There are four types of sake to be sampled along the tour, among them Kinpyo is the most highly recommended with its sweet aftertaste it makes an excellent match for Japanese snacks.

The World Glassware Hall
Gourmet & Shopping

Niida Honke Sake Brewery

Located in the sleepy village of Tamura-machi, and surrounded by sprawling rice fields is the Niida-Honke brewery. Since its founding in 1711, Niida Honke has seen eighteen generations of head brewers, each bringing their own personality and subtle changes to the company and its sake. The current head brewer is Yasuhiko Niida, an incredibly nice person with an awe inspiring passion for making Sake. Under Mr. Niida’s supervision, Niida Honke has seen many changes. In 2011 the brewery celebrated its 300th anniversary and the achievement of using 100% natural rice in its brewing process. Unfortunately, this was the same year as the Great East Japan Earthquake and the following nuclear disaster. Despite the difficulties, Niida Honke worked hard to return the health of the rice fields. After the fields were cleaned and returned to their healthy status, a decision was made to move the company into a more sustainable and natural direction with the goal of creating its sake with 100% natural and organic ingredients. They currently grow much of the rice used to create their sake in the fields that surround the brewery. Working with local farmers to create healthy, high quality rice that is grown without the use of pesticides or harmful chemicals. In the future Niida Honke aims to brew all of its sake in natural wooden tanks, switch entirely to solar power, and grow 100% of its own rice. For each bottle that you buy, Niida Honke takes one step closer to these goals.Read more about the sake brewing process at Niida Honke!

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Koori Town's Peach Blossoms

Koori Town, home to some 236 acres of peach orchards, is a wonderful place to view peach blossoms when spring rolls around. 24,000 trees fill the 120 hectares of peach orchards located along the banks of the Abukuma in Koori Town's Danzaki area - many of these are located along a road known locally as 'the Peach Line'. When these flowers all open their petals in unison, the landscape is transformed into a sea of pink, truly a utopian vista. Their Majesties the Emperor and Empress (the Crown Prince and Princess at the time) walked through this orchard on April 26 1996 - an event which is commemorated with a memorial tablet that stands along the Peach Line. Visitors to the peach orchards on the banks of the Abukuma river will be treated to views of Mt. Handa, the symbol of Koori Town. The best time to visit the peach orchards is mid-April.

You might also like

Komine Castle
History & Culture

Komine Castle

Shirakawa Castle (Komine Castle) was heavily damaged during the Boshin War (also known as the Meiji Restoration), and was restored in the 1990s.Komine Castle's restoration marked the first time in over 120 years that a restoration had been attempted on a triple turret (yagura) structure. Blueprints from the late Edo Period were used as references for the repair of this structure.As a result of using these blueprints, it was possible to restore the castle almost exclusively using wood construction techniques. This amazing architecture, along with the extraordinary techniques used to make the stone wall around the castle, make this castle extremely special. There is also an exhibition hall on site.

Sukagawa Tokusatsu Archive Center
History & Culture

Sukagawa Tokusatsu Archive Center

The Archive Center was opened on November 3rd, 2020 in order to share the unique artistry of Tokusatsu (Japanese special effects) with the world. Early Tokusatsu creator and Sukagawa Native, Eiji Tsuburaya came to be known as the “Father of Tokusatsu” due to his incredible Tokusatsu special effects in films such as Godzilla (1954) and television series such as the Ultra-series.Prior to the development of advanced digital and cgi special effects, science fiction films heavily relied on Tokusatsu techniques to create captivating live-action scenes where enormous monsters or Kaijyu wreak havoc upon cities. Smashing and exploding miniature models of cities allowed film makers to create incredible scenes for films and television.The Archine Center stores and displays many historic pieces that were used in or otherwise are related to the production of Tokusatsu films. There is even a special where visitors can watch Tokusatsu artists in action!©円谷プロ

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)
History & Culture

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Nihonmatsu Castle was built in 1643 by Mitsushige Niwa, the first feudal lord of the Nihonmatsu Domain. This domain had command over a territory producing 100,000 koku of rice (one koku being the amount of rice needed to feed one man for a year) and Nihonmatsu Castle was one of the strategic points used by the Tokugawa Shogunate forces. The castle fell in Boshin War after a fierce battle, precipitating the tragedy of the Nihonmatsu Youth Corps. Today, the castle ruins have been turned into a prefectural natural park, with the stone walls being the only structures remaining from the old days. The seasonal beauty of the landscape with the restored castle and the surrounding natural environment is a soothing experience for visitors, particularly in the spring when the 1,700 cherry trees in the park are in full bloom, making it seem as if the castle is surrounded by haze of blossoms. This is why Nihonmatsu Castle is also referred to as "Kasumigajo" (meaning "castle in the mist"). In autumn, the park is crowded with visitors to Japan's largest chrysanthemum doll festival.

Kaiseizan Daijingu Shrine
History & Culture

Kaiseizan Daijingu Shrine

Kaiseizan Daijingu Shrine (開成山大神宮) is a Shinto shrine located in front of Kaiseizan Park in Koriyama City. The shrine was established in 1876 and is famous for its cherry blossom festival during the spring, as well as for its New Year celebrations, among other festivities.Three deities are enshrined at Kaiseizan Daijingu Shrine: Amaterasu, a Shinto deity believed to be the ancestress of the Imperial family of Japan; Emperor Jimmu, who according to Japanese mythology was the first emperor of Japan; and Toyouke-Ōmikami, the goddess of agriculture and industry in Shintoism.

Top