Nanko Park

Nanko Park

In 1801, Matsudaira Sadanobu, the twelfth Lord of Shirakawa, constructed a recreational area which was to be opened to anybody - regardless of status or family background. This recreational area turned into Nanko Park, which is considered to be the Japan's oldest public park. There are Yoshino cherry blossoms (about 800 trees), azaleas, pine trees, and maple trees at the edge of lake. You can enjoy seasonal scenery such as cherry blossoms in spring, fresh green leaves in early summer, autumn colors, and winter scenery with the beautiful contrast of the Nasu Mountains. The park contains Nanko Shrine, where Sadanobu is enshrined as a deity. Next to Nanko Shrine stands the beautiful Japanese gardens Suirakuen. At Suirakuen, visitors can try traditional Japanese tea served in a tea room, which boasts a spectacular view of the gardens. There are a number of shops, cafés, and restaurants along the edge of Lake Nanko. One of the local specialities to look out for is nanko dango, which are sticky rice balls on a skewer, served with different toppings.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://shirakawa315.com/eng/nanko_park.html
Contact

Shirakawa Tourism and Local Products Association

(+81) 248-22-1147

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable (See map for location of Lake Nanko East Parking Lot)
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessNanko, Shirakawa City, Fukushima Pref. 961-0812
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min from Shirakawa I.C. exit on the Tohoku Expressway; 15 min from Shirakawa Chuo Smart exit (ETC only)

By Bus: 10 min from JR Tohoku Shinkansen Shin-shirakawa Station to Nanko Park bus stop

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Takashiba Dekoyashiki (Takashiba Craft Village)

A traditional craftsmen's village bestowing an air of the olde-worlde. The papier-mâché crafts of the town, made lovingly by hand for generations, will bring a smile to your face. Takashiba Dekoyashiki is an historical craftsmen's village, and was at one time under the protection of the Miharu feudal domain. Dating back 300 years to the Edo Period, this community is said to have been born when a traveller from Kyoto taught the people how to craft papier-mâché dolls using a special paint called 'nikawa'. Take a walk through the nikawa-scented streets of Takashiba Dekoyashiki and step into the Japan of old. Visitors can try their hand at painting various traditional crafts, including the Miharu-koma horse wooden doll.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Majyo-no-hitomi (The Witches’ Eye Lake)

Majyo-no-hitomi, or The Witches’ Eye Lake, is a volcanic lake that was formed during a volcanic eruption many years ago. Unique minerals in the water cause the lake to appear different colors, giving the lake it’s official name of Goshiki-numa (Five Colored Lake), but most often it is a bright blue.  The nickname of “Witches Eye” comes from the unique appearance of the lake that is visible in late spring when the snow melts enough so that only a white ring remains around the lake to form the white of what appears to be an enormous single eye. This lake viewpoint can be reached by an intermediate hike that begins at the Jododaira Visitors Center, stop by for a map and safety information before hiking. 

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