Hanamiyama

Hanamiyama

Hanamiyama Park is a privately-owned field for flowering and ornamental trees, in southeast Fukushima City.

The park is located within a satoyama-type landscape i.e. managed woodland hill country close to human habitat. What originally began more than 60 years ago with local farmers planting flowers and trees, has grown into a beautiful scene. The landowner generously turned the area into a park in 1959 to allow visitors to enjoy the beautiful flowers there.

Hanamiyama Park, and the wider Hanamiyama area, is now visited by thousands of admirers every year!

Springtime visits see cherry, plum, and forsythia trees paint everything in vivid colors. A gentle pink and purple landscape waving in the breeze with the picturesque snow-capped Azuma Mountains in the distance makes for an amazing sight.

The riot of spring colors is spectacular enough to merit calling this park Fukushima's very own paradise.

The flowering landscape moves all who see it and has been preserved through the cooperation of the local residents. Enjoy a leisurely one-hour stroll that will take you from the foot of the hill to the summit. Travel through groves of flowering trees and other vibrant flowers in full bloom.

Hanamiyama is the perfect getaway for a day for nature lovers, hikers, or people trying to escape for a short time.

The best part is that spring isn’t the only beautiful time to visit. Marvel in wonder during the lush green summer foliage or the dappled colors of autumn. When you visit this fairytale-like wonderland, it is recommended that visitors wear comfortable walking shoes as the terrain includes graveled paths, steep slopes, and slippery areas. Mid- through late April is the peak season, so ready your camera and your heart for the beauty that awaits.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.hanamiyama.jp/en/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-522-3265

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable. Disabled Parking Available. Temporary parking lots are opened during spring.
Entrance FeeFree
Accommodation details

Pets: Not allowed

Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Early April

English signage available.

Accessible toilets available.
Access Details
Access1-1 Sakae-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-8031
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 20 min drive from Fukushima-Nishi I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 15 min bus ride from Fukushima Station on the JR Tohoku Main Line

Useful Links

Hanamiyama in Full Bloom

Fukushima's Top Cherry Blossom Spots

Hanami Day Trip from Tokyo

Hanami: Picnic Under the Sakura

Related trips

  1. Nature

    A Day of Cherry Blossoms

    Enjoy this day-long magical romp through springtime while you travel by train. Leave from the charming Fukushima Station and experience what the prefecture has to offer to lovers of nature and history. Bring your camera and your walking shoes and get ready for a day amongst the flowers of Fukushima. After leaving Fukushima Station, you’ll visit Hanamiyama. This springtime park paradise of flowers will leave you breathless from its beauty. You will fall in love with the hillsides colored in shades of pink, purple, and yellow. See the cherry trees in blossom, along with plum trees and forsythia trees with snow-capped mountains in the background. After Hanamiyama, travel to Nihonmatsu Castle for a time-traveling trip to the past. See the castle grounds and learn about the history of the area all while you enjoy the splendor of spring with the almost two thousand cherry trees in bloom. When you’ve had your fill of nature and history, use the train and head back to Nihonmatsu Station.  

    A Day of Cherry Blossoms

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