Azuma Orchard

Azuma Orchard

Azuma Orchard is located along the Fruit Line (a road in Fukushima City which is surrounded by orchards). Here visitors can pick their own fruit, such as cherries from early June, peaches from mid-July, nashi (Japanese pears) and grapes from early September, and apples from October.

The grounds of Azuma Orchard include a shop which has been recently renovated. Visitors can also enjoy soft-serve ice-cream in a range of seasonal flavors.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://blog.goo.ne.jp/adumakajyu(Japanese)
Contact

Azuma Orchard

(+81) 24-525-1460

Best Season
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Open every day in season (mid-June to early-December)

ParkingParking for 13 buses, and 30 cars available
Related info<b><u>Costs for Fruit picking (30 minutes)</b></u>

Cherries:
Adults (junior high school students and above) 1,365 yen
Children (From 4 to 11 years old) 1,050 yen

Peaches and Grapes:
Adults 840 yen
Children 630 yen

Nashi and Apples:
Adults 525 yen, Children 420 yen

Prices include tax
Access Details
Access1-13 Hirano Nishihara, Iizaka, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Train: At JR Fukushima Station, transfer to the Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line, get off at Hirano Station, then walk for 30 minutes.

By Car: 10 min drive from Fukushima Iizaka I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

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