Natsuigawa Valley

Natsuigawa Valley

Natsuigawa Valley continues 15 km along JR Ban-etsu East Line. In autumn, the train passes the valley at a slow speed so that passengers can enjoy the awesome views from its windows. The beautiful view of the waterfalls and clear streams meandering through rocks is definitely worth seeing.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://kankou-iwaki.com/nature/227.html
Contact

Iwaki Tourism and City Planning Bureau

(+81) 246-44-6545

Best Season
  • Summer
  • Autumn
ParkingAvailable ( Please park at the Natsuigawa Valley Campsite Parking Lot)
Related infoAutumn Leaf Season: From late Oct. to mid-Nov.
Access Details
AccessEda, Ogawamachi Kamiogawa, Iwaki City, Fukushima Pref. 979-3124
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 30 min drive from Iwaki-Chuo I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway. Please park at the Natsuigawa Valley Campsite Parking Lot (Address and location shown above)

By Train: Short walk from Eda Station (JR Ban-etsu East Line). The Nishiki Lookout is about 40 min on foot from Eda Station.

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