Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen Garden

Oyakuen was used approximately 600 years ago as a villa for the then lord of the Aizu Domain. Subsequently, in the mid-17th century, the lord of the Aizu Domain started growing medicinal herbs within the grounds which he developed to protect the citizenry from epidemics. This lead to the garden gaining the name "Oyakuen", which literally means "medicinal garden."

The traditional garden has been preserved as it was long ago, and Oyakuen has now been designated as an important national asset. The buildings within the grounds were used by the lord as a place of relaxation and for entertainment. Accordingly, Oyakuen still contains buildings devoted to Japanese tea. Visitors can enjoy a cup of herbal tea here even today.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://aizuwakamatsu.mylocal.jp/en/trip/spot-list/-/spotdetail/spotinfo/1000000066/3999496
Contact

Oyakuen Garden

(+81) 242-27-2472

info@tsurugajo.com

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

8:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open all year

ParkingFree (61 cars)
Entrance FeeAdults: 330 yen
High school students: 270 yen
Junior high and elementary school students: 160 yen
Related infoEnjoy seasonal views of Oyakuen Garden throughout the year.
Recommended photo spot: The view of the garden from the tea house
Access Details
Access8-1 Hanaharumachi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0804
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Aizu-Wakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Bus: Take the Haikara-san or Akabe sightseeing loop bus from Aizuwakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) and get off at Oyakuen Bus Stop. From there, walk for 3 min. The gardens are a 15 min walk from Tsurugajo Castle

Nearby

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Kannonji-gawa River Cherry Trees

Only a one-minute walk north of Kawageta Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line) is this beautiful 1 km-path along the banks of the Kannonji-gawa River. In the spring the path transforms into a spectacular tunnel of Yoshino cherry trees and weeping cherry trees. Kannonji-gawa River is perhaps the most fantastic place to see cherry blossoms in Fukushima Prefecture; the calming river and the lovely petals falling like snow are a sight that can’t be beat. The lush green bank contrasting with the pale pink blossoms creates an unforgettable scene. Altogether there are about 200 trees growing along the Kannonji-gawa River on both banks. Additionally, the river maintains its natural curves and bends as it hasn’t undergone any work to adapt its shape to the city surrounding it. It’s one of Fukushima’s most splendid and respected natural landscapes. Currently, the Kannonji-gawa River cherry trees rank number 11 of the best places to see cherry blossoms in the entire Tohoku region! While enjoying the delicate blossoms and the sweet, fresh air, visitors to Kannonji-gawa River can also enjoy some of the tasty food from street vendors available only during the cherry blossom season. We’d really recommend a springtime picnic right on the river bank with various yatai (food stand) delicacies. Be sure to come back during the evening when the trees are illuminated, and the river transforms into a magical dreamscape.

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Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls

Breathe in the cool, crisp negative ion air and relax under the shade of trees as you marvel at the beauty of the Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls. Two waterfalls make up the Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls; Odaki is considered the male fall and is the larger of the two (16 m tall), while the smaller of the two is considered female and called Medaki. The sight is indeed lovely to behold as the silvery waterfalls over the rocks below. The Tatsuzawa Fudo Falls are located in Inawashiro Town and are beautiful year-round. These falls are also a treasure for photographers because of how serene they are surrounded by nature on all sides. In spring and summer, the lush greenery makes the whole forest feel alive; in autumn, the vibrant colors of the leaves reflect off the water and give it a painterly feel. With proper snow equipment, you can even visit in winter and see the stark contrast falls against the white snow. The drive up to the falls is only 15 minutes from central Inawashiro Town, and there’s a small parking lot about a 10-minute hike from the falls. The walk itself is easy and smooth. You’ll first pass Lady Medaki before arriving at the main Odaki falls. And with maple trees framing the waterfall just perfectly, you’ll want to be sure to remember your camera and perhaps a tripod as well. There is even nearby onsen for you to stay and relax afterward. So why not visit the falls to relax your mind and soul, and then go for a soothing dip in the hot springs to rejuvenate your body. You won’t be disappointed with the vista of the falls or the nearby area.

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Experience a simulation of the 1888 Mt. Bandai Eruption in 3D! Mt. Bandai 3D World is a theater developed by Sony, situated right across the road from the Mt. Bandai Eruption Memorial Museum. The circular walls inside the building are covered with a large, panoramic 3D screen - measuring 4.5 m in height, and 42 m around. The powerful acoustics transport visitors to the Urabandai area of 1888, and allow them to feel as if they were there during the great eruption of the same year. The theater's 3D graphics simulate this event, portraying the fleeing of animals that sense the eruption in advance, and the disarray of huge boulders and intense volcanic mud splashes being flung in the air due to the eruption. There is also a simulation of a "walk in the sky" around Mt. Bandai, where visitors can experience a panoramic bird's-eye view of Mt. Bandai's across the four seasons. Take in alpine plants such as skunk cabbages and Nikko-kisoge flowers as you pass over the Oguninuma Wetlands. Shows usually start twice an hour (the first on the hour, and the second at 30 minutes past.)

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The Grave of the Matsudaira Family

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