Komado Marsh

Komado Marsh

Untouched natural marsh surrounded by beech trees.

Komado is a small and lovely marsh located at the top of Komado Pass in Minamiaizu Town. Although small, it is an ideal place for exploring moorland vegetation. You can see a variety of plants from one season to the next, and can enjoy spectacular views of the highlands as well.

The marsh was designated as a National Natural Treasure in 1970.
 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://showavill.info/see/komadoshitsugen/(Japanese)
Contact

Showa Village Tourism Association

(+81) 241-57-3700

Best Season
  • Summer
ParkingFree parking available for 20 cars
Related infoKey points of the sightseeing spot/ recommended points for tours:
Skunk Cabbages, Cotton Grass, Nikko Kisuge
Best season: From May to July.
Access Details
AccessOashi, Showa, Onuma District, Fukushima 968-0214
View directions
Getting there

By Car: Approx. 1 hour and 20 min. from Nishinasuno I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway. (Brief Directions from Nishinasuno I.C. Exit: Take Route 400, then Route 121, then Route 289)

By Train: 30 min by taxi from Aizu Tajima Station (Aizu Railway)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Yunokami Onsen

Yunokami Onsen is famous for having one of the only thatched roof station buildings in Japan. The hot spring area is fed from 8 source springs. Each ryokan (traditional Japanese inn) in the town draws its hot water directly from the source. The clear, transparent water is beloved for being soft and gentle on the skin. Many lodges offer just day-use of their baths, making it a great place to enjoy on a whim. There is also a public foot bath located at Yunokami Onsen Station. During the cherry blossom season, visitors can enjoy a warm foot bath while watching the light pink petals fluttering in the wind.

The World Glassware Hall
Shopping & Souvenirs

Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan is a shopping complex next to Tsurugajo Castle. Here you can try local cuisine, from Wappa Meshi and Sauce Katsudon, to soba noodles and Kitakata Ramen. The French restaurant "Racines" is also on the premises, so that both Japanese and western-style cuisines can be enjoyed in one location. The restaurants have seating for approximately 1,000 guests. The first floor contains a tax-free shop that sells local Aizu goods and souvenirs, from ready-to-cook Kitakata Ramen, soba noodles, Japanese pickles, and sweet treats, to traditional crafts like Akabeko lucky red cow. You can even try painting your own Akabeko cow (a traditional folk toy which is said to bring luck), and take it home as a souvenir of your trip. Painting an Akabeko takes about 30 minutes, and a reservation is required for groups. The parking area accommodates full-size buses as well as personal vehicles.  

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