Furoyama Park Yama-tsutsuji (Mountain Rhododendron)

Furoyama Park Yama-tsutsuji (Mountain Rhododendron)

The famous Okukuji Prefectural Nature Park in Ibaraki Prefecture designated Furoyama Park as a top Green Spot of Fukushima. Furoyama Park is famous for its yama-tsutsuji (mountain rhododendron), which come into bloom from late April through to early May. There are around 3,000 rhododendron plants which cover the park in deep shades of red. Climb halfway up the hill to gain a great view of the town.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://hanawa-kanko.com/hana/188(Japanese)
Contact

Hanawa Town Tourism Association

(+81) 247-43-3400

Best Season
  • Spring
Parking5 cars (municipal parking also available)
Entrance Fee100 yen
Related infoBest time to visit: Late April to early May

See here for multilingual pamphlets published by Hanawa Town Tourism Association.
Access Details
Access271-1 Sakuragi-cho, Hanawa, Hanawa Town, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 70 min from Naka I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway via Route 349. (Or 45 min drive from the Shirakawa I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway, via Route 289 or Route 118)

By Train: 15 minutes walk from Iwaki-Hanawa Station on the JR Suigun Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Shopping & Souvenirs

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop

Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop (also known as the ‘Bussankan’) is a short walk from the west exit of Fukushima Station. Enjoy a delicious lunch, and even do a sake tasting, at the Fukushima Lounge. All food and sake has been grown and produced locally in Fukushima – a prefecture which is blessed with a wealth of natural beauty. Browse locally-made items – which have been designed over generations in response to Fukushima’s rich history and culture, and have become representative of various areas of Fukushima Prefecture – displayed and sold in the ‘Local Products’ section. Great food, dried goods, local products and traditional crafts – the best from all over the prefecture can all be found at Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop. As well as displaying and selling delicious local produce and locally-made folk crafts from a wide-range of areas across the prefecture, Fukushima Prefecture Souvenir Shop also provides information on local products and sightseeing opportunities in Fukushima. Local artisans, farmers and performers also regularly visit the shop to display and sell their work, so definitely make sure to visit.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple

Yamamoto Fudoson Temple was built over 1000 years ago in a rocky cavern. The temple can be reached by taking paths lined with century-old Japanese cedar trees, and climbing a 130-step stone staircase. The cave that makes up part of the Yamamoto Fudoson temple grounds is where the Buddhist deity enshrined at this temple is worshipped. Yamamoto Fudoson Temple is located in Yamamoto Park. This park is centered in a valley – 5 km of which is designated as an Okukuji Prefectural Natural Park. A wonderful place for flower-viewing throughout the year, this area is also great for experiencing beautiful autumn leaves.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Nihonmatsu Castle was built in 1643 by Mitsushige Niwa, the first feudal lord of the Nihonmatsu Domain. This domain had command over a territory producing 100,000 koku of rice (one koku being the amount of rice needed to feed one man for a year) and Nihonmatsu Castle was one of the strategic points used by the Tokugawa Shogunate forces. The castle fell in Boshin War after a fierce battle, precipitating the tragedy of the Nihonmatsu Youth Corps. Today, the castle ruins have been turned into a prefectural natural park, with the stone walls being the only structures remaining from the old days. The seasonal beauty of the landscape with the restored castle and the surrounding natural environment is a soothing experience for visitors, particularly in the spring when the 1,700 cherry trees in the park are in full bloom, making it seem as if the castle is surrounded by haze of blossoms. This is why Nihonmatsu Castle is also referred to as "Kasumigajo" (meaning "castle in the mist"). In autumn, the park is crowded with visitors to Japan's largest chrysanthemum doll festival.

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