Koshidai no Sakura (The Koshidai Cherry Tree)

Koshidai no Sakura (The Koshidai Cherry Tree)

This huge Japanese cherry tree is over 400 years old and has been designated as a national Natural Treasure. The tree has a trunk circumference of about 7.2 meters and stands 20 meters high, and was thus selected as one of the "100 Giants of the Forest" by Japan's Forestry Agency. Koshidai Cherry Blossom Festival is held every year on May 3. A Yabusame horseback archery event accompanied by taiko drumming takes place during this festival, and local organizations set up food stalls.

Photo tip: Try taking photos from the south side of cherry blossoms.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.town.furudono.fukushima.jp/kanko-dentou-bunka/see/keikan/furudonosakura/190(Automated translation available)
Contact

Furudonomachi Industrial Promotion Department

(+81) 247-53-4620

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest viewing period: From late April to early May
Access Details
AccessKoshidai, Oguta, Furudono Town, Ishikawa District, Fukushima Pref. 963-8303
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 50 min drive from the Iwaki-Yumoto I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum

Traditional structures from northern Fukushima built between the Mid-Edo to Meiji era (1700 – 1912) – including restaurants, private houses, storehouses, and even a theater – have been relocated to Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum.At Minka-en these buildings are restored and displayed to the public, along with a range of artefacts and tools used in daily life in years gone by.Also, a number of special events, such as sword-smithing demonstrations, are held every year to celebrate and promote traditional folk crafts and skills.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art, located at the foot of Mt. Shinobu on the north side of Fukushima City, houses over 2,000 pieces of art, including paintings, block prints, carvings, craft works, and more. Some highlights of the museum's collection include paintings by Shoji Sekine and woodblock prints by Kiyoshi Saito, both of whom were born in Fukushima Prefecture, as well as a collection of impressionist art, and 20th century paintings by artists such as Ben Shahn and Andrew Whyeth.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Mt. Iwatsuno

Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai. One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century. Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer. It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Jododaira Visitor Center

Jododaira Visitor Center, located at an altitude of 1500 m, stands partway along the Bandai-Azuma Skyline sightseeing road. Jododaira acts as a base to spend the day hiking nearby mountain routes, including Mt. Higashi-Azuma (1,975 m) and Mt. Issaikyo (1,949 m). For those who don’t fancy a long hike, the 1-hour round trip walk up and around the crater at Mt. Azuma Kofuji (1,705 m) is perfect, as it is a very short walk from Jododaira Visitor Center. The Azuma mountains are all totally unique, and are great places to enjoy local flora and fauna. If hiking in this area, please be mindful that the altitude reaches close to 2000 m, so make sure to take equipment necessary in the event of a sudden weather change. The Jododaira area is also prone to high volcanic gas levels, so it is a good idea to check whether the area is open to visitors before making the drive up the mountain roads.

You might also like

Mt. Shinobu (Shinobuyama)
Nature & Scenery

Mt. Shinobu (Shinobuyama)

Mt. Shinobu, with a total altitude of 275 meters, is one of the landmarks of Fukushima City. It is estimated that it formed about 500.000 years ago when the Fukushima basin caved in and Mt. Shinobu became an isolated hill, which later became the object of multiple local poems, stories, and legends.Visitors can hike up Mt. Shinobu for unobstructed views of the cityscapes. Hikers of all levels can try climbing Mt. Shinobu, as its peak can be reached in a few hours and many parts of it can be reached by car.Each year in April there is a spring festival with cherry blossom night illuminations that attract hordes of visitors. Summer and autumn are also great times to follow the hiking routes at Mt. Shinobu.A spiritual power spot for locals, Haguro Shrine can be found at the top of the central peak, where there is also a giant straw sandal that weighs about 2 tons and is 12 meters in length and is believed to be among the biggest in Japan. The sandal is paraded along Fukushima City each year in August during the Waraji Festival. Also in Mt. Shinobu, you can find the Shinobuyama Neko Inari Jinja(‘cat shrine’), and the Gokoku Shrine, along with several parks.For stunning views of the city, including the Shinkansen bullet train tracks, head to the Karasugasaki Observation Deck on the western side. Located nearby are the Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art and the Fukushima Prefectural Library.

Irimizu Limestone Cave (Irimizu Shonyudo)
Nature & Scenery

Irimizu Limestone Cave (Irimizu Shonyudo)

Visitors looking for a cool and adventurous experience should consider visiting the Irimizu Limestone Cave (入水鍾乳洞) in Tamura City.Perhaps less known than the nearby Abukuma Cave, the Irimizu Limestone Cave offers visitors the opportunity to venture into its depths—the narrow cave is 900 m in total and is divided into three courses (A, B and C), each more extreme than the previous one.Visitors should bring adequate clothing and shoes, as the inside of the cave is wet and slippery with irregular rocky ground and gushing streams.Course A is the least extreme, and the way into the cave is lit, although there are puddles and wet spots, and you will need to duck in some places since there are short and narrow spots. Course A is 150 m long and takes approx. 30 minutes to complete.Courses B and C go through an area of the cave where there is less conditioning. Visitors have to walk while having water up to their knees and go through slippery and narrow gaps by candlelight or flashlight.Course B is 450 m and takes about 60 minutes to complete, while course C is 300 m and takes about 90 m to complete. Visitors hoping to undertake course C, the most difficult of the three, have to make a reservation before their visit, as the course can only be completed alongside an experienced guide. *Course C is not available and is not taking reservations as of May 2023.The temperature inside the cave is typically between 10 and 15 degrees regardless of the season.There are candles, rubber shoes, flashlights and other items available for renting at the entrance.Prices are as of March 2023.The cave has been designated as a National Natural Treasure, and it’s easy to see why. You’re bound to become a geology enthusiast after experiencing the charms of the cave.

Top