Aizu Painted Candles Craft Experience

Aizu Painted Candles Craft Experience

Aizu Erosoku (painted candles) are sumptuous items that were long-prized among samurai families. Delicate and vivid patterns such as chrysanthemums, plum blossoms, and peonies are painted onto candles made of natural Japan wax extracted from the fruits of lacquer trees. Each candle is still painstakingly painted one by one, and they serve as regal decorations in Shinto and Buddhist ceremonies and weddings. A candle painting experience is available at Ozawa Candle Shop (Reservation required).

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://aizuwakamatsu.mylocal.jp/en/trip/spot-list/-/spotdetail/spotinfo/1000000033/3999496
Contact

Ozawa Candle Shop

(+81) 242-27-0652

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable (1 space)
Related infoOzawa Candle Shop painting classroom open from 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM.
Shop open from 9:00 AM to 19:00.
Candle painting experience prices start at 1,800 yen (excluding taxi) for 2 candles.
Access Details
Access6-27 Nishisakae-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Train: 15 min walk from Nanukamachi Station on the JR Ban-etsu West Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
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Snow Monsters at Mt. Nishi-Azuma

Mt. Nishi-Azuma is a 2035m tall mountain that can be accessed from Fukushima Prefecture’s Kitashiobara Village. During the coldest points of winter, it is possible to find frozen “snow monsters” up on the mountain. Of course the snow monsters are not really monsters, these are trees that have endured blizzards and collected snow until they became covered with a thick frost! From the Grandeco Snow Resort’s Gondola Station, you transfer to a ski lift, and from there it is 3 hours on foot to reach this viewpoint. Especially in the snow, the mountains can be difficult to navigate, so you must climb together with a guide in winter. If you are interested in visiting here, please contact us!

The World Glassware Hall
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Ashinomaki Snow Park

Looking for a fun place to enjoy the snow with the whole family? Ashinomaki Snow Park is a great place to enjoy the fluffy Fukushima snow. The snow park is set in a picturesque field that is bordered by a lovely forest and river. Activities such as snowmobile driving, banana boat riding, tubing, snowball fights are all possible here! You can even hang out in Japanese igloos or “kamakura” and roast mochi over a fire. Riding in banana boats and being pulled in snow boats are especially popular activities at the snow park. The snow park is also a popular destination for snowy photoshoots! If you want to visit on a weekday, reservations must be made by 5:00 p.m. the day before. For weekend visitors no reservation is required. Dates of operation are dependent on snow fall, for the 2022 season the dates of operation at January 20 – February 28.

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Mt. Bandai

Originally known as Iwahashi-yama, literally a rock ladder to the sky, the renamed Mt. Bandai is no less impressive. Often referred to as 'Aizu's Mt. Fuji', Mt. Bandai is one of the 100 most famous mountains in Japan, and has even been selected as one of the top 100 geographic landmarks in Japan. In 2011, the mountain was certified as a geopark, which is a unified area with geological heritage and international significance, as defined by UNESCO. There are seven climbing routes for Mt. Bandai, with the trail starting at the Happodai trailhead being the most popular, and easiest route. From the Happodai trailhead, the 3.5 km route takes around 2 hours to reach the summit. The various routes range from 2 to 4 hours and from 3 to 7 km. At Koubou Shimizu, one of the mountain stops, there are two shops where trekkers can buy drinks, snacks, and souvenirs, but please note that there is no accommodation available. For many Buddhist mountain fanatics, Mt. Bandai holds a place of great significance. Enichi-ji Temple, located on the southwestern foot of Mt. Bandai, is a popular temple to visit nearby. The mountains situated around the temple make for a serene vista where one can feel the power of nature. Enichi-ji Temple was founded one year after Mt. Bandai erupted, in 807 C.E.; in the past, some superstitious people believed there was a connection between the eruption and the temple’s founding... Interestingly, Mt. Bandai used to be shaped more like the famous Mt. Fuji, but after a volcanic eruption in 1888, the shape changed to what we see today. It is thanks to that eruption that the mountain gained its rugged, sharp look and the Urabandai area behind Mt. Bandai was created. For non-hikers, the Bandaisan Gold Line is a popular sightseeing road that leads up the southwestern side and offers brilliant vistas of the foliage, especially in autumn when the colors change.

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Snowshoe Trekking

Blue sky, endlessly-fresh dancing powder snow. Come and enjoy this fascinating winter wonderland! The field covered with a marsh and bushes in summer, changes to a white snow field ideal for snowshoe trekking in winter. No skills or previous experience is necessary. You can enjoy the snow-covered world from the very day you start. Snowshoe trekking can even be enjoyed by those who are not athletic. You can walk on lakes or ponds. You can find the tracks of rabbits and squirrels in the forest. Let's enjoy a great variety of nature which can only be seen in winter in Urabandai.

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