Byakkotai Memorial Hall

Byakkotai Memorial Hall

This hall exhibits both opposing factions of the Boshin War, with a focus on documents related to the Byakkotai, which lost the war, as well as many documents of the Seigun (Western Army) and Shinsengumi.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://aizuwakamatsu.mylocal.jp/en_US/trip/spot-list/-/spotdetail/spotinfo/1000000277/3999496
Contact

(+81) 242-24-9170

Opening Hours

Apr. to Nov.: 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM | Dec. to Mar.: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Open throughout the year

ParkingAvailable
Related infoAdults: 400 yen
High school students: 300 yen
Junior High and Elementary School students: 200 yen
Access Details
Access33 Bentenshita, Yahata, Ikki-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture.
View directions
Getting there

By Bus: Take the Haikara-san or Akabe loop bus from Aizuwakamatsu Station to Iimoriyama bus stop, and then walk 5 min.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses

The deep snows of the Aizu region meant that, in the past, cut off from other areas for months at a time, its residents had to use all their wits just to make it through the winters. These L-shaped farmhouses known as "magariya" conceal a number of the innovations developed by this local people.As you can see in the layout of the house, the long earth floor stretches out towards the road. Long ago, horses were indispensable in farming, but the deep snow of winter meant that keeping them tied up in external stables was cruel. Therefore, stables were built into the house, meaning that the unfloored working area inevitably became larger. Having this area far from the road made getting to the road through the snow more difficult, as up to a meter can fall overnight. Accordingly, with the aim of reducing work, locating this working area as close as feasible to the road ended up with the house being laid out in an L-shape.Many of these houses were built in Maezawa and throughout Tateiwa Village, as a way of living with horses in the deep snows of the Aizu region.The houses have become more and more comfortable over time, with the "magariya" design lasting until the present day. While this magariya-style farmhouse used to be built everywhere that saw heavy snow, they are gradually disappearing. Accordingly, the Maezawa magariya have been designated as historical cultural assets.In 1985, the village began actively preserving these houses, and this area now attracts many visitors. One of the magariya buildings have been repurposed into a museum in the village where visitors can learn about life in Maezawa.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Yunokami Onsen Station

Yunokami Onsen Station is one of only 2 train stations with a thatched roof in Japan. The station is known for its great location as a cherry blossom viewing spot with a unique atmosphere. There is an irori (sunken fireplace) where tourists can warm themselves up in winter, and a foot bath sourced from natural hot spring water just next to the station. Yunokami Onsen town is a popular place to stay the night for those visiting destinations such as Ouchi-juku and To-no-hetsuri are located in the same area.

The World Glassware Hall
Gourmet & Shopping

Ishiharaya Restaurant

A lovely restaurant where you can savor the flavors of handmade soba and coffee. This restaurant is commited to serving delicious, seasonal food. In summer, the noodles are made thinner. In winter, they’re made a bit thicker. You’ll be able to relish the stone-ground, handmade noodles. Their most popular topping for soba is their large umeboshi (sour pickled plums) from the Kishu Domain, which can be enjoyed as part of Ishiharaya's Grated Plum Soba dish.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Aizu Bukeyashiki (Samurai Residence)

Aizu Bukeyashiki (Samurai Residence) is a historical open-air museum where visitors can learn about the history of Aizu and sample some of the specialty products of Fukushima.Stroll around the residences to take in traditional Japanese architecture, including the residence of Tanomo Saigo, the Aizu Domain's chief retainer, a magistrate's office, a tea ceremony house, a rice mill, and a warehouse (resource center).Visitors can also enjoy local specialty food at the onsite Kuyotei restaurant, and find specialty products from Aizu and other parts of Fukushima at Sato-Kobo Kokon, and enjoy hand-painting traditional toys and practicing Japanese archery, which is perfect for young kids.Besides such cultural enjoyment, the natural beauty of the spring cherry blossoms and the autumnal foliage are a major attraction for tourists.

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Enzoji Temple
History & Culture

Enzoji Temple

A symbolic temple of Aizu, Enzoji was built about 1,200 years ago in 807.Fukuman Kokuzo Enzoji Temple (Enzoji Temple for short) was built by Tokuichi Daishi, a noted priest from the Aizu region. The main hall of the temple rises high above a huge crag. From here, the Tadami River can be viewed flowing magnificently through the town.You can also see the various views of each season, with cherry blossoms in spring, mist over the river in summer, red maples in autumn, and snow in winter.The temple has many highlights, such as a treasure house and monuments in memory of poets, inscribed with their poems and haiku.The temple is dedicated to Fukuman Kokuzo Bosatsu (the Bodhisattva of wisdom). There are many legends associated with the temple. For example, one legend tells of how when Kobo Daishi threw wood shavings from the statue of Kokuzo Bosatsu into the Tadami River, they immediately turned into countless Japanese dace fish.Another story is about how a red cow helped with the difficult construction of the temple - a story that led to the widespread acceptance of the "akabeko" red cow as an important symbol of Fukushima.One more story is that of Nanokado Hadaka Mairi ("Naked Man Festival" at Nanukado Temple). The legends are many and varied.

Fukushima Prefectural Museum
History & Culture

Fukushima Prefectural Museum

The Fukushima Prefectural Museum (Fukushima Museum) [福島県立博物館] is in Aizu-Wakamatsu City, about a ten-minute walk (750 m) from Tsurugajo Castle. The museum covers the history of Fukushima prefecture from the primitive age through modern times with exhibitions of historical items, relics, scale models, and replicas of objects of historical significance.Its general exhibition is divided into six parts and explains the history of the area in chronological order. Starting with archaeological findings from the Glacial Age, the formation of the Japanese islands, and the first settlements (all covered in the Primitive Age section), the exhibits show the cultural developments and the evolving way of life through to modern times. The last exhibit, ‘Fukushima and its Nature’, details the prefecture’s ecosystems and how they have been impacted by natural disasters through the years.The museum also has departmental exhibition rooms that focus on Fukushima’s geological features and folk culture.Visitors can ask for an English guidebook at the entrance, which contains explanations of most items on exhibit. Information in English, Chinese, and Korean is displayed on some screen panels at the museum.The museum also houses a tea room, the Prefectural Museum Tea Room ‘Tsukinai’, that serves lunch and a variety of drinks. To the right of the main entrance is a recreational room for children. The room has a tatami area, children’s books, wooden toys, and decorations in traditional Aizu momen (cotton) textiles, which give it a unique, warm feel. Throughout the year, several special events and activities for children are hosted in this space.

Aizu Urushi Lacquerware
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Aizu Urushi Lacquerware

Aizu Urushi Lacquerware has a very long history – predating lacquerware from Wajima or Tsushima. Aizu Lacquerware was originally produced in areas of Aizu that experience very heavy annual snowfall. The industry began to boom about 400 years ago - this development was initiated by feudal lord Gamo Ujisato’s endorsement of Aizu Lacquerware.From then onwards, techniques used in the production of Aizu Lacquerware were refined and Aizu Lacquerware became very famous in Japan.  You can make your paint your own design onto Aizu Lacquerware items, or even try painting with lacquer, in Aizu region.Makie Painting Experience WorkshopsSuzuzen (Aizu-Wakamatsu City) From 1,900 yen Page on Fukushima.Travel Website Suzutake (Aizu-Wakamatsu City) From 1,000 yen Must book in advance Page on Fukushima.Travel Website (Japanese)Bansho (Aizu-Wakamatsu City) From 1,200 yen  Irregular opening hours in winter Website (Japanese)Fukubun (Aizu-Wakamatsu City) From 1,600 yen Irregular opening hours Must book in advance Website (Japanese)Shitsugei Tsunoda (Urabandai Area) From 1,000 yen They also have an experience where you can paint with real lacquer (From 10,000 yen) Must book in advance Website (Japanese)

Ouchi-juku
History & Culture

Ouchi-juku

Take a journey to the past in Fukushima Prefecture’s Ouchi-juku area. This isolated village boasts thatched-roof houses and natural streets making you feel at one with the people who lived here hundreds of years ago.Nestled in the southwestern mountains of Fukushima, Ouchi-juku is a great spot to visit thanks to its unique charm and history. This village was established under the post station system of the Edo period, and played a vital role as a rest stop for travelers.In 1981, the well-preserved streets of Ouchi-juku led to it being designated as an Important Preservation District for a Group of Traditional Buildings. It isn’t difficult to see why—the village looks as it did during its heyday. And with no telephone or electric wires above ground, the view from the top of the hill overlooking the village is marvelous.It is a picturesque village where you can lose yourself to the flow of time. The traveler’s road that used to run through this village was called the Shimotsuke Kaido Route, or the Aizu Nishi Kaido Route.Ouchi-juku not only connected Aizu to Nikko, it also connected Aizu-Wakamatsu to Imaichi, a post town on the Nikko Kaido Route in Tochigi Prefecture. This road was frequented by many travelers as well as by the processions of feudal lords who had to travel to and from Edo periodically.Travelers of the Edo Period rested at the inns of Ouchi-juku to relieve their fatigue. Nowadays, festivals and events help draw in new visitors. The annual Snow Festival in February turns Ouchi-juku into a pretty candlelit scene.Visit in July to see a procession of dancers dressed in traditional Edo Period costumes, and you might even get to wear a happi (festival attire jacket) and join the locals in their celebrations!And when you’re feeling hungry be sure to try some of the local specialties, which include negi soba (fresh buckwheat noodles eaten using a green onion), stick-roasted char fish, and more.There’s a little bit of everything at Ouchi-juku.

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