Shibuki-gori (Naturally-forming ice sculptures)

Shibuki-gori (Naturally-forming ice sculptures)

If you head to Tenjinhama beach on Lake Inawashiro in the depths of winter, through the trees at its south towards the mouth of the Nagase river, you will see the "shibuki-gori" natural ice sculptures.

Lake water is picked up by strong winds from the west, and meets the trees on the coastline. There it creates a very unusual phenomenon with a beauty that rivals the "juhyo" (ice-covered trees) seen at the tops of mountains.

Local peoples and visitors alike never tire of these sights.

You can also see other shapes formed by ice here, such as ice drifts and the prominent "Omiwatari" cracked, rising ice on the beach and lake surface.

Please note that Shibuki-gori are natural ice sculptures, and therefore their appearance and size change by the day. Please check before visiting.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www1.bandaisan.or.jp/ib/en/
Contact

Inawashiro Tourism Association

Best Season
  • Winter
Access Details
AccessNishihama Nakakomatsu, Inawashiro, Yama District, Fukushima
View directions
Getting there

Views like those shown in the photographs on this page can be seen from the Tenjinhama parking lot to the right (towards Shidahama) for about 1 km along the lakeshore.

Nearby

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The Grave of the Matsudaira Family

The gravesite was constructed in 1657 when Masayori, the heir of the first Aizu lord Hoshina Masayuki, passed away. Tombs for the second lord Masatsune through the ninth lord Takamori, as well as their wives and children, stand side by side. A Buddhist funeral was conducted for the second lord, but the Shinto style was used for all the other lords. This gravesite is one of Japan’s top daimyo family graves, and is known for its history and scale. The Grave of the Matsudaira Family has also been nationally recognized as an Important Historic Site.

The World Glassware Hall
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Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses

The deep snows of the Aizu region meant that, in the past, cut off from other areas for months at a time, its residents had to use all their wits just to make it through the winters. These L-shaped farmhouses known as "magariya" conceal a number of the innovations developed by this local people. As you can see in the layout of the house, the long earth floor stretches out towards the road. Long ago, horses were indispensable in farming, but the deep snow of winter meant that keeping them tied up in external stables was cruel. Therefore, stables were built into the house, meaning that the unfloored working area inevitably became larger. Having this area far from the road made getting to the road through the snow more difficult, as up to a meter can fall overnight. Accordingly, with the aim of reducing work, locating this working area as close as feasible to the road ended up with the house being laid out in an L-shape. Many of these houses were built in Maezawa and throughout Tateiwa Village, as a way of living with horses in the deep snows of the Aizu region. The houses have become more and more comfortable over time, with the "magariya" design lasting until the present day. While this magariya-style farmhouse used to be built everywhere that saw heavy snow, they are gradually disappearing. Accordingly, the Maezawa magariya have been designated as historical cultural assets. In 1985, the village began actively preserving these houses, and this area now attracts many visitors. One of the magariya buildings have been repurposed into a museum in the village where visitors can learn about life in Maezawa.

The World Glassware Hall
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Sazaedo Temple

Sazaedo is a Buddhist temple built in 1796. Its architecture is similar in shape similar to the shell of a horned turban (‘sazae’ in Japanese) hence its name ‘Sazaedo’. The inside of the temple consists of a double-helix slope, meaning that visitors who come to pray won’t meet anybody coming from the opposite direction. This one-way system makes Sazaedo extremely unique. In 1995, it was appointed as a National Important Cultural Property, and in 2018 it was showcased in Michelin Green Guide (1 star, interesting place to visit).

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