Michi-no-Eki Karamushi Ori-no-Sato (Roadside Station)

Michi-no-Eki Karamushi Ori-no-Sato (Roadside Station)

The tradition of weaving ‘karamushi' (plant fiber from nettles, known as 'Ramie") has been handed down in Showa Village for generations. Learn more about this tradition at this facility, which house a shop selling locally-produced goods, and an area where you can try ramie weaving for yourself.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.vill.showa.fukushima.jp/sato.stm(Japanese)
Contact

Michi-no-Eki Karamushi Ori-no-Sato (Roadside Station)

(+81) 241-58-1655

info@Karamushi.co.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

No regular holidays

ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree entrance. There are charges for craft experiences.
Access Details
AccessAzauenohara 1, Sagura, Showa Village, Onuma District, Fukushima Pref. 968-0215
View directions
Getting there

By Car:

  • 35 min by taxi or rental car from Aizu-Tajima Station (Aizu Railway).
  • 1 hour drive from Ouchi-juku
  • 1 hour 15 min drive from central Aizu-Wakamatsu City.

By Bus:

  • 35 min by bus from JR Aizu-Kawaguchi Station (JR Tadami Line).
  • Get off the bus at Shimosagura bus stop, then walk for 3 min.

Nearby

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Historical Sites

Aizu Hanko Nisshinkan

Aizu Hanko Nisshinkan was the highest level of learning institution of its time. It was established in 1803 by the Aizu Domain for the purpose of fostering Japan's next generation of talented samurais. Children of samurai families entered this school at the age of ten and worked on academic studies and physical exercises to instill both physical and mental discipline. The property, covering about 26,500 square meters in area, used to house such facilities as a martial arts training hall, an astronomical observatory, and Suiren-Suiba Ike, Japan's oldest swimming pool. During the late Edo Period, the school turned out a great deal of excellent talent, including the legendary group of young warriors, the Byakkotai. The facilities, which were burned down during the Boshin War, have been rebuilt faithful to their original design, and now function as a hands-on museum that features exhibits of the magnificent architecture of Edo Period and dioramas of school life as it used to be. Visitors can enjoy practicing some of essential disciplines of the samurai,including tea ceremony, Japanese archery, meditation, and horseback riding, as well as experiencing hand painting of an akabeko (redcow), a traditional good-luck charm of Aizu.

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Historical Sites

The Warehouses of Kitakata

In the Meiji and Taisho eras, Kitakata City experienced a boom in the construction of kura (traditional Japanese storehouses). There are approximately 4,200 still left in the city today. While these were used both as storehouses for businesses in the brewing and lacquerware industries, the building of a kura has traditionally been considered among Kitakata locals as a great symbol of status, and a source of pride. In the Mitsuya District, the rows of brick storehouses are reminiscent of rural Europe, whereas in the Sugiyama district, they have roofs that take the appearance of helmets. Visitors can see a range of kura and other traditional buildings at Kitakata Kura-no-Sato museum, or enjoy exploring the kura of the city on foot or by bike. See here for a 1 day itinerary for visiting Kitakata City.

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Shopping & Souvenirs

Honke Kanouya

Among the simple color palette of Ouchi-juku, Honke Kanouya will draw your eyes with their brightly-colored collection of goods. Lining the store front is a wide assortment of items like vegetable-shaped beanbags to ornaments to decorations to fabric accessories. All these crafts are handmade. The eye-catching goods make great souvenirs for family and friends alike! Recommended items include the Aizu-made fabric accessories and selected seasonal vegetables beanbags.  

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Tsurugajo Kaikan

Tsurugajo Kaikan is a shopping complex next to Tsurugajo Castle. Here you can try local cuisine, from Wappa Meshi and Sauce Katsudon, to soba noodles and Kitakata Ramen. The French restaurant "Racines" is also on the premises, so that both Japanese and western-style cuisines can be enjoyed in one location. The restaurants have seating for approximately 1,000 guests. The first floor contains a tax-free shop that sells local Aizu goods and souvenirs, from ready-to-cook Kitakata Ramen, soba noodles, Japanese pickles, and sweet treats, to traditional crafts like Akabeko lucky red cow. You can even try painting your own Akabeko cow (a traditional folk toy which is said to bring luck), and take it home as a souvenir of your trip. Painting an Akabeko takes about 30 minutes, and a reservation is required for groups. The parking area accommodates full-size buses as well as personal vehicles.  

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