Sazaedo Temple

Sazaedo Temple

Sazaedo is a Buddhist temple built in 1796. Its architecture is similar in shape to the shell of a horned turban (‘sazae’ in Japanese), hence its name "Sazaedo". The inside of the temple consists of a double-helix slope, meaning that visitors who come to pray will not meet anybody coming from the opposite direction. This one-way system makes Sazaedo extremely unique.

In 1995, it was appointed as a National Important Cultural Property, and in 2018 it was showcased in Michelin Green Guide (1 star, interesting place to visit).

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://samurai-city.jp/en/sightseeing/2116
Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

Apr. - Dec.: 8:15 AM - Sunset / Jan. - Mar.: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Entrance FeeAdults: 400 yen / High School Students: 300 yen / Junior High & Elementary School Students: 200 yen
Access Details
Access1404 Bentenshita, Ikki-machi Yahata, Aizu Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0003
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min drive from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit (Ban-etsu Expressway)

By Bus: 5 min on foot from the Haikara-san / Akabe Loop Bus "Iimoriyama-shita" Bus Stop

Useful Links

5 Reasons to Visit Sazaedo Temple

2 Days in Aizu-Wakamatsu

Mt. Iimoriyama

Related trips

    1. Driving

      Ultimate Fukushima Prefecture Road Trip

      This trip highlights some of the best Fukushima has to offer and is perfect for those looking to get the most out of the prefecture in a limited time. Take in castles, nature, traditional villages, and more as you treat yourself to local styles of soba and ramen along the way. Renting a car is a must if you want to hit all the spots on this tour. You can take it slow and complete this trip over three days, or skip out an overnight stay in Urabandai area, and do it in two days. Start the day from Fukushima Station with a scenic drive to the the beautiful Urabandai region. We recommend taking the Bandai-Azuma Skyline road so that you can enjoy a mountain drive and check out the great sights at Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. From there, take the stunning sightseeing road Azuma-Bandai Lake Line into Urabandai. Explore the Urabandai area, have lunch, go on a walk around the five-colored ponds of Goshiki-numa, and maybe even take a dip in a hot spring or two. Choose whether take it slow and stay the night in Urabandai area, or whether to press on to Aizu-Wakamatsu City.  Later that day - or the next morning, depending on your schedule - head into the castle town of Aizu-Wakamatsu City where samurai culture is prevalent. The majestic Tsurugajo Castle offers beautiful views of the surroundings from the keep. Check out the nearby Tsurugajo Kaikan to paint an akabeko or two and maybe have some lunch. Then explore the mysterious Sazaedo Temple and the surrounding Mt. Iimoriyama area. From here, we suggest staying overnight in the city. There are plenty of budget hotels in Aizu-Wakamatsu, but if you are looking for something traditionally Japanese, we recommend looking into lodging at the nearby Higashiyama Onsen hot springs town just east of the city. On the next day prepare to jump into the past with a trip to the Ouchi-juku mountain village. You can spend hours here shopping and eating local foods while walking up and down the street lined with traditional thatched-roof houses. Lastly, head to the To-no-Hetsuri Crags, a natural monument filled with towering cliffs overlooking the Okawa River. Cross the nearby suspension bridge which offers breathtaking views of the surroundings. After getting fully refreshed head back to Shin-Shirakawa station by car, drop off your rental car, and connect back to Tokyo or the next stop on your journey!

      Ultimate Fukushima Prefecture Road Trip

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Oze is home to a plethora of beautiful flowers. These include the Asian skunk cabbage that blossoms in the marshes as the snow melts, and the bright yellow of the Nikko Kisuge, which is reflected in the marshes just when the surrounding mountains become green. The nature of Oze is symbolized by its beautiful flowers, and together with the mountains, lakes, marshes, rivers, forests, and wildlife that lives in this region, create a stunning sight. Chozo Hirano opened up the area around 100 years ago, and because of the protection of its magnificent nature up until now, Oze has become a symbol of nature conservation in Japan. The beautiful nature of Oze presents a different face throughout the seasons, and all continue to charm us. Key points of the sightseeing spot/ recommended points for tours:  In order to both preserve the precious nature of Oze, and to be able to come face-to-face with its splendor, we recommend that you visit on weekdays, and take your time to encounter the nature of Oze. Oze has the Ozenuma Visitor Center and the Oze-Yamanohana Visitor Center as locations from which you can both appreciate Oze's nature, and learn about the environment. At the visitor center, you can learn from displays that explain in an easy-to-understand the formation of the nature in Oze, points to see, and the most up-to-date information about the natural environment. This lets you more fully enjoy the appeal of the nature of Oze.Visits are even more enjoyable when you know more; therefore we recommend visits with a guide who can tell you more about the nature and charm of Oze. We urge visitors to make use of the certified guides who have a wealth of knowledge about Oze's nature, culture, and history, and who can ensure your visit is safe.

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