Cherry Blossoms in Baryo Park

Cherry Blossoms in Baryo Park

As the park's 630 Somei Yoshino cherry blossom trees bloom simultaneously, it is easy to be swept away by the scenery. You will be able to enjoy the coming of spring as you walk along rows of cherry blossom trees on the sando (a road which runs from the torii gate to the shrine).

Baryo Park is a well-known location for viewing cherry blossoms, and every year from early to mid April the park holds a light-up event at night. We recommend you visit in the evening to see the cherry blossoms illuminated by the lights from the paper lanterns. A good spot for taking pictures is at the bottom of the sando, looking up at the torii.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://soma-kanko.jp/(Japanese)
Contact

Soma City Tourism Association

(+81) 244-35-3300

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest time to see cherry blossoms: Early to Mid April
Access Details
Access140 Kitamachi, Nakamura, Soma City, Fukushima Pref. 976-0042
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 min drive from Soma I.C. exit off the Joban Expressway.

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