Chinkin Taiken (Sunken-Gold Design Experience)

Chinkin Taiken (Sunken-Gold Design Experience)

The Tradition of Aizu lacquerware in Fukushima Prefecture has continued for 400 years. Try out creating a design on Aizu Lacquerware with a technique called Chinkin ("Sunken-gold") at Tsunoda Lacquer Art Studio. Sketch your design on tracing paper, and then mark it onto the lacqerware with a needle. Tsunoda san will help you fill the grooves created by your needle with gold and silver powder to create your design. Alternatively, try painting your own design on Aizu lacquerware at the studio. Either experience will create a great souvenir of your trip in Japan. These experiences take about an hour.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.tsunoda-shitsugei.com/%E4%BD%93%E9%A8%93/(Japanese)
Contact

Tsunoda san

You can book your own sunken-gold painting experience or lacquer painting experience by emailing Tsunoda san at urushi.tsunoda@gmail.com

Opening Hours

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Irregular days off. Please book in advance to make sure the studio is open on the day of your visit.

Entrance FeePrices start at 1,000 yen, and depend on the item to be designed.
Access Details
Access1096-217 Soharayama, aza hibara, Kitashiobara Yama-gun Fukushima pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Train: Take a Bandai Toto Bus heading for Urabandai Kyukamura (裏磐梯休暇村) from JR Inawashiro Station. Get off at Sohara Iriguchi bus stop (曽原湖バス停). From the bus stop, the studio is 13 minutes on foot.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Cultural Experiences

Mitsutaya

Mitsutaya is a speciality restaurant with roots dating back to the end of the Edo Period (around 1835). The restaurant is situated in a renovated miso storehouse. It is therefore fitting that the restaurant is famous for a local Aizu meal called 'miso dengaku'. Miso dengaku refers to skewered vegetables and meat which are topped with a miso paste before being cooked over an open flame. The skewers are cooked one by one. Skewer ingredients include konjac, deep-fried tofu, sticky, savory rice balls called 'shingoro mochi', and more. Each small dish is coated in miso for an unforgettable and savory flavor.  

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