Enichi-ji Temple

Enichi-ji Temple

Enichi-ji Temple was built at the beginning of the Heian period, Enichi-ji Temple is known as the oldest temple in Tohoku with original foundation stones still on display.

There are countless fascinating temples and shrines scattered around the Enichi-ji Temple complex, so make sure to reserve time for exploring the surrounding area.

Also, light-up events are held several times a year in which the temple is bathed in light during the evenings.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.town.bandai.fukushima.jp/site/enichiji/(Japanese)
Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open from Apr. 1 to Nov. 31 (Closed for Winter)

Entrance Fee300 yen to enter the Enichi-ji Temple complex (500 yen if combined with entrance to the small onsite museum)
Access Details
AccessMotoderakami-4950 Bandai, Yama District, Fukushima 969-3301
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 7 min drive from Bandai Kawahigashi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 20 min walk from Bandaimachi Station on JR Ban-estu West Line

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Maezawa L-shaped Farmhouses

The deep snows of the Aizu region meant that, in the past, cut off from other areas for months at a time, its residents had to use all their wits just to make it through the winters. These L-shaped farmhouses known as "magariya" conceal a number of the innovations developed by this local people.As you can see in the layout of the house, the long earth floor stretches out towards the road. Long ago, horses were indispensable in farming, but the deep snow of winter meant that keeping them tied up in external stables was cruel. Therefore, stables were built into the house, meaning that the unfloored working area inevitably became larger. Having this area far from the road made getting to the road through the snow more difficult, as up to a meter can fall overnight. Accordingly, with the aim of reducing work, locating this working area as close as feasible to the road ended up with the house being laid out in an L-shape.Many of these houses were built in Maezawa and throughout Tateiwa Village, as a way of living with horses in the deep snows of the Aizu region.The houses have become more and more comfortable over time, with the "magariya" design lasting until the present day. While this magariya-style farmhouse used to be built everywhere that saw heavy snow, they are gradually disappearing. Accordingly, the Maezawa magariya have been designated as historical cultural assets.In 1985, the village began actively preserving these houses, and this area now attracts many visitors. One of the magariya buildings have been repurposed into a museum in the village where visitors can learn about life in Maezawa.

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Ashinomaki Onsen

This hot spring resort town is well-known for its beautiful vallies, and the high quality of the abundant hot water that gushes from the town's natural hot springs.Ashinomaki Onsen is a convenient place to stay overnight for those visiting sightseeing spots such as Ouchi-juku, To-no-hetsuri, and Aizu-Wakamatsu City, as the town is located in between these key places.After enjoying a full day of sightseeing in Aizu, visitors can relax and lose track of time while bathing in a hot spring bath at a resort hotel or quaint ryokan.

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Established in 1993, Kitakata Kura no Sato is a base for passing down the cultural tradition of building kura (traditional warehouses) and magariya (L-shaped houses), which are valuable parts of the lifestyle heritage of the Kitakata area.Ten traditional-style buildings stand within this 4,500 square-meter area. These include a mise-gura (a kura used as a shop), a miso-gura (kura for preserving miso paste), a kokumotsu-gura (a kura for storing grain), and a kura-zashiki (a kura used as a residence), as well as the residences of local officials (Go-gashira and Kimoiri) constructed around a courtyard.The landscape with its old warehouses and residences induces a sense of nostalgia in the minds of Japanese people. Each of the warehouses also serves as an exhibition space for various resources on different themes: stencils for Aizu dyeing; a photo gallery exhibiting the works of Minoru Kaneda, who introduced Kitakata to outsiders as the town of kura; Iwako Uryu, a social worker during the Meiji Period; Monzo Hasunuma, the leader of a youth movement group called Shuyodan; and the Kitakata Incident, which took place in the midst of the democratic movement during the Meiji Period. Visitors can also acquire background knowledge here before going on a tour to see the many kura that are dotted around the city of Kitakata.

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