Enichi-ji Temple

Enichi-ji Temple

Enichi-ji Temple was built at the beginning of the Heian period, Enichi-ji Temple is known as the oldest temple in Tohoku with original foundation stones still on display.

There are countless fascinating temples and shrines scattered around the Enichi-ji Temple complex, so make sure to reserve time for exploring the surrounding area.

Also, light-up events are held several times a year in which the temple is bathed in light during the evenings.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.town.bandai.fukushima.jp/site/enichiji/(Japanese)
Best Season
  • Spring
  • Summer
  • Autumn
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Last entrance at 4:30 PM)

Open from Apr. 1 to Nov. 31 (Closed for Winter)

Entrance Fee300 yen to enter the Enichi-ji Temple complex (500 yen if combined with entrance to the small onsite museum)
Access Details
AccessMotoderakami-4950 Bandai, Yama District, Fukushima 969-3301
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 7 min drive from Bandai Kawahigashi I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 20 min walk from Bandaimachi Station on JR Ban-estu West Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Hot Springs

Higashiyama Onsen

Established over 1,300 years ago, Higashiyama Onsen is a well-known retreat area in Aizu-Wakamatsu City. The recognized historical onsen town is said to have been founded by the Buddhist priest Gyōki. According to legend, he found the area by following a bird with three legs, an auspicious and mystical omen. The area was popular with people from all over Aizu during the Edo Period and was developed as a retreat area. Today it is listed among the top three onsen towns of old Tohoku. Being only 10 minutes by car from the heart of Aizu-Wakamatsu City, visitors are sure to enjoy their time at Higashiyama Onsen. The traditional Japanese ryokan (inns) of Higashiyama Onsen line both sides of the Yukawa River, giving the area a picturesque air. Let your mind and body relax in the warm sodium-sulphate waters and clean, crisp air. A visit in autumn treats ryokan and hotel guests to the fantastic experience of bathing in a hot springs while viewing autumn leaves. The ryokan in the area are a mix of modern and traditional, perfect to suit any taste. For sightseeing, there are plenty of shops and restaurants in the area for you to enjoy local goods and cuisine. Moreover, staying in Higashiyama Onsen is a great option for those who would like to sightsee in Aizu-Wakamatsu. Higashiyama Onsen is also home to geigi (geisha), whose traditions have been passed down through the generations. If you make a reservation, you can watch them perform. These classically trained entertainers are skilled in song, dance, and music. Their breathtaking performances reflect historical ballads and stories—the tale of the Byakkotai is especially popular. It is the tragic story of teenage samurai who committed ritual suicide at Mt. Iimoriyama.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Tsurugajo Castle

Tsurugajo Castle allows visitors the opportunity to experience history, nature, and tradition with all five senses. Despite being mostly reconstructed, the surrounding park's stone walls remain in their original state. In 2010, for the first time since it was refurbished in 1965, the castle underwent a cosmetic restoration. Following completion in 2011, the same red-tile roofs seen by the Byakkotai (during the Boshin War and finals days of the Tokugawa shogunate) are now displayed for all to see. This castle is one of the final strongholds of samurai that remained loyal to the shogunate and today stands as a symbol of courage and faithfulness. Within the castle tower's museum, the swords and armor of the castle’s successive lords are on display. Visitors can watch a CG-enhanced theatrical video reflecting on the great history of Aizu. In addition to the historical atmosphere surrounding Tsurugajo, visitors can sense the changes that have occurred throughout history, thanks to the engaging and informative museum within the castle walls. It’s fun to gaze across Aizu from the fifth floor, like a feudal lord admiring his domain—the viewing platform up here provides panoramic views taking in Mt. Bandai and Mt. Iimoriyama. The castle is also a must-see in the springtime when approximately 1,000 cherry trees offer a magnificent display within the castle's grounds. When you’re in the mood for a rest, visit the Rinkaku Tea Rooms for some freshly-prepared matcha green tea. This tea house on the grounds of Tsurugajo was vital in the spread of this traditional art—and had it been destroyed during the Meiji Restoration, tea ceremony as it is known in Japan might have vanished. Tsurugajo Castle is truly a place where the modern visitor can slip into the past and become immersed in history.

The World Glassware Hall
Museums & Galleries

Mt. Bandai Eruption Memorial Museum

This museum introduces the eruption of Mt. Bandai, and uses large sized models and "body sonic" facilities to give a simulated experience of the eruption in 1888 of Mt. Bandai. The plants and animals that live around Mt. Bandai are introduced using a diorama, and nature observation meetings are held several times a year. This museum has wheelchair access and bathroom facilities. The museum is across the road from Mt. Bandai 3D World, and a combined entrance ticket is available for the two facilities.

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This shrine is dedicated to Masayuki Hoshina, who founded the Aizu Domain during the first half of the Edo Period. During the early Edo Period, Hoshima Masanobu – an ancestor of feudal lords from the Aizu Domain – was enshrined at Hanitsu Shrine. The grounds exude a holy atmosphere that can be felt throughout the shrine precincts. The 400 years of history held by this shrine, starting from the Edo Period, will surely be of interest to history enthusiasts and fans of the Aizu Domain alike. During the autumn, the grounds are covered with a gorgeous carpet of bright red leaves. Many tourists and photographers come to visit Hanitsu Shrine in Autumn to capture this scene in their photos.

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<p>Take a journey to the past in Fukushima Prefecture&rsquo;s Ouchi-juku area. This isolated village boasts thatched-roof houses and natural streets making you feel at one with the people who lived here hundreds of years ago.</p><p>Nestled in the southwestern mountains of Fukushima, Ouchi-juku is a great spot to visit thanks to its unique charm and history. This village was established under the post station system of the Edo period, and played a vital role as a rest stop for travelers.</p><p>In 1981, the well-preserved streets of Ouchi-juku led to it being designated as an Important Preservation District for a Group of Traditional Buildings. It isn&rsquo;t difficult to see why&mdash;the village looks as it did during its heyday. And with no telephone or electric wires above ground, the view from the top of the hill overlooking the village is marvelous.</p><p>It is a picturesque village where you can lose yourself to the flow of time. The traveler&rsquo;s road that used to run through this village was called the Shimotsuke Kaido Route, or the Aizu Nishi Kaido Route.</p><p>Ouchi-juku not only connected Aizu to Nikko, it also connected Aizu-Wakamatsu to Imaichi, a post town on the Nikko Kaido Route in Tochigi Prefecture. This road was frequented by many travelers as well as by the processions of feudal lords who had to travel to and from Edo periodically.</p><p>Travelers of the Edo Period rested at the inns of Ouchi-juku to relieve their fatigue. Nowadays, festivals and events help draw in new visitors. The annual <a href="http://fukushima.travel/destination/ouchi-juku-snow-festival/204">Snow Festival</a> in February turns Ouchi-juku into a pretty candlelit scene.</p><p>Visit in July to see a procession of dancers dressed in traditional Edo Period costumes, and you might even get to wear a <em>happi </em>(festival attire jacket) and join the locals in their celebrations!</p><p>And when you&rsquo;re feeling hungry be sure to try some of the local specialties, which include <em>negi soba</em> (fresh buckwheat noodles eaten using a green onion), stick-roasted char fish, and more.</p><p>There&rsquo;s a little bit of everything at Ouchi-juku.</p>

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