Yunokami Onsen Station

Yunokami Onsen Station

Yunokami Onsen Station is one of only 2 train stations with a thatched roof in Japan. The station is known for its great location as a cherry blossom viewing spot with a unique atmosphere. There is an irori (sunken fireplace) where tourists can warm themselves up in winter, and a foot bath sourced from natural hot spring water just next to the station. Yunokami Onsen town is a popular place to stay the night for those visiting destinations such as Ouchi-juku and To-no-hetsuri are located in the same area.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://shimogo.jp/sightseeing/yunokamionsen/(Japanese)
Contact

Shimogo Town Tourism Association

(+81) 241-69-1144

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable
Access Details
AccessYunokami, Shimogo Town, Minamiaizu District, Fukushima Pref. 969-5206
View directions
Getting there

By Car:

  • 50 min by car from the Aizuwakamatsu I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway
  • 15 min by car from Ouchi-juku

By Train:

  • Get off at Yunokami Onsen Station (Aizu Railway Line). It takes 1 hour to arrive at Yunokami Onsen Station from Aizuwakamatsu Station

External resources

Related trips

  1. Driving

    Must See Sights of Fukushima:Halal Friendly Model Route

    Including halal friendly information! This is a two-day model course by public transportation and rental car that takes you through breathtaking nature to the historic post town of Ouchi-juku and Tsurugajo Castle, home of the once mighty Aizu samurai clan! Information about halal restaurants and lodgings is available at the bottom of this page. From Tokyo to Fukushima, you can conveniently use the Shinkansen bullet train or the Tobu Liberty train that leaves from Asakusa station. From the terminus at Aizu Tajima Station, you can easily hire a cab that offers a full-day plan to get to the historic Ouchi-juku and nearby Aizu-Wakamatsu City. On the first day, you will visit Ouchi-juku, where you can experience the historical charm of the Edo period, followed by the castle town of the former Aizu clan, Tsurugajo Castle in Aizu-Wakamatsu City. On the second day, get a taste for the rich nature of Tohoku. From Aizu-Wakamatsu Station, you can rent a car and drive towards the Urabandai area. Goshiki-numa, located in Bandai Asahi National Park, is a beautiful natural park named after its five colored lakes and ponds, which appear to change colors depending on the light at different times or day and seasons. Hop into a rowboat and paddle around to admire the carp swimming around in the crystal-clear waters of the lake. There is a trail that takes you around the Goshiki-numa area, where you can appreciate the hues of the various ponds. If you happen to be visiting in the fall, you will be blown away by the spectacular array of autumn leaves in their stunning gradients of red and gold. Finally, be sure to go fruit picking so that you can taste the delicious flavors of Japanese fruits at the end of your trip. HALAL-friendly Restaurant ※Reservations required [Japanese Restaurant] Kissui Restaurant Aizu-Wakamatsu City "Halal / VG Requests OK / Reservations required" http://aizu-kissui.jp [Chinese Restaurant] Hotel Hamatsu / Shaga Chinese Restaurant Koriyama City https://www.hotel-hamatsu.co.jp HALAL-friendly accommodations ※Reservations required ・Yosikawaya Iizaka Onsen Ryokan http://www.yosikawaya.com/ ・Inawashiro Rising Sun Hotel (Villa Inawashiro) https://www.villa.co.jp/ ・Bandai Lakeside Guesthouse Kitashiobara Village https://www.bandai.ski/ Taxi ・Minamiaizu Kanko(Hire a Taxi for 2-hour or 4-hour flat rate plan) https://www-minamiaizu-co-jp.translate.goog/tour/index.php?_x_tr_sl=ja&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=ja Rent a Car ・Eki Rent-a-car https://www.ekiren.co.jp/phpapp/en/  

    Must See Sights of Fukushima:Halal Friendly Model Route

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
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Sannokura Plateau Sunflower Field

In summer, the 5.4 hectares of land within the Sannokura Ski Resort grounds become painted yellow with 1.5 million sunflowers. The sunflower field consists of 3 main areas, which can be enjoyed from early August to early September. Also, visitors to Sannokura Plateau between March and June can enjoy impressive views of fields of bright, yellow canola flowers. What's more, no matter the season, the panoramic views overlooking the Aizu basin from an elevation of 650 m make a visit to Sannokura Plateau very worthwhile.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Ouchi-juku

<p>Take a journey to the past in Fukushima Prefecture&rsquo;s Ouchi-juku area. This isolated village boasts thatched-roof houses and natural streets making you feel at one with the people who lived here hundreds of years ago.</p><p>Nestled in the southwestern mountains of Fukushima, Ouchi-juku is a great spot to visit thanks to its unique charm and history. This village was established under the post station system of the Edo period, and played a vital role as a rest stop for travelers.</p><p>In 1981, the well-preserved streets of Ouchi-juku led to it being designated as an Important Preservation District for a Group of Traditional Buildings. It isn&rsquo;t difficult to see why&mdash;the village looks as it did during its heyday. And with no telephone or electric wires above ground, the view from the top of the hill overlooking the village is marvelous.</p><p>It is a picturesque village where you can lose yourself to the flow of time. The traveler&rsquo;s road that used to run through this village was called the Shimotsuke Kaido Route, or the Aizu Nishi Kaido Route.</p><p>Ouchi-juku not only connected Aizu to Nikko, it also connected Aizu-Wakamatsu to Imaichi, a post town on the Nikko Kaido Route in Tochigi Prefecture. This road was frequented by many travelers as well as by the processions of feudal lords who had to travel to and from Edo periodically.</p><p>Travelers of the Edo Period rested at the inns of Ouchi-juku to relieve their fatigue. Nowadays, festivals and events help draw in new visitors. The annual <a href="http://fukushima.travel/destination/ouchi-juku-snow-festival/204">Snow Festival</a> in February turns Ouchi-juku into a pretty candlelit scene.</p><p>Visit in July to see a procession of dancers dressed in traditional Edo Period costumes, and you might even get to wear a <em>happi </em>(festival attire jacket) and join the locals in their celebrations!</p><p>And when you&rsquo;re feeling hungry be sure to try some of the local specialties, which include <em>negi soba</em> (fresh buckwheat noodles eaten using a green onion), stick-roasted char fish, and more.</p><p>There&rsquo;s a little bit of everything at Ouchi-juku.</p>

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