Hanitsu Shrine

Hanitsu Shrine

This shrine is dedicated to Masayuki Hoshina, who founded the Aizu Domain during the first half of the Edo Period. During the early Edo Period, Hoshima Masanobu – an ancestor of feudal lords from the Aizu Domain – was enshrined at Hanitsu Shrine.

The grounds exude a holy atmosphere that can be felt throughout the shrine precincts. The 400 years of history held by this shrine, starting from the Edo Period, will surely be of interest to history enthusiasts and fans of the Aizu Domain alike.

During the autumn, the grounds are covered with a gorgeous carpet of bright red leaves. Many tourists and photographers come to visit Hanitsu Shrine in Autumn to capture this scene in their photos.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://bandaisan.or.jp/ib/en/history_institution/
Contact

Inawashiro Tourism Association

(+81) 242-62-2048

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Entrance FeeFree entrance
Access Details
AccessAza Mineyama 1, Inawashiro-machi, Yama-gun, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: Around 10 min from Inawashiro Bandai Kogen I.C. exit off of the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: Around 5 min by taxi from Inawashiro Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

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