Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art, located at the foot of Mt. Shinobu on the north side of Fukushima City, houses over 2,000 pieces of art, including paintings, block prints, carvings, craft works, and more. Some highlights of the museum's collection include paintings by Shoji Sekine and woodblock prints by Kiyoshi Saito, both of whom were born in Fukushima Prefecture, as well as a collection of impressionist art, and 20th century paintings by artists such as Ben Shahn and Andrew Whyeth.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://art-museum.fcs.ed.jp/English
Contact

Fukushima Prefectural Museum of Art

(+81) 24-531-5511

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingFree parking is for approx. 150 cars
Related info<u>Hours: </u>9:30 AM - 5:00 PM (Admittance until 4:30 PM)


<u>Admission Fees for Regular Exhibitions*</u>:

Adults: 270 yen.

18 years old and younger: Free
*Please note, additional fees apply for temporary exhibitions.
Access Details
Access1 Nishiyozan, Moriai, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min from Fukushima Iizaka I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Bus: Take the Momo-rin Bus from the bus stop No. 9 on the east side of Fukushima Station. Get off at Kenritsu Bijutsukan Iriguchi bus stop. From there, the museum is a 3 min walk.

By Taxi: 5 min from the JR Fukushima Station East Exit

By Train: 2 min walk from Bijutsukan Toshokan Station on the Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line.

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