Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum

Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum

Traditional structures from northern Fukushima built between the Mid-Edo to Meiji era (1700 – 1912) – including restaurants, private houses, storehouses, and even a theater – have been relocated to Fukushima City Minka-en Open-Air Museum.

At Minka-en these buildings are restored and displayed to the public, along with a range of artefacts and tools used in daily life in years gone by.

Also, a number of special events, such as sword-smithing demonstrations, are held every year to celebrate and promote traditional folk crafts and skills.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://minka-en.com/en/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Closed: Every Tuesday; Between Dec. 29 and Jan. 3

Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessOishimae, Kaminagura, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-2155
View directions
Getting there

By Bus: Take a bus heading to Sabara from the JR Fukushima Station. Get off at Muroishi bus stop, then walk for 8 min.

By Train: 25 min by taxi from JR Fukushima Station.

Useful Links

Exploring Minka-en, Fukushima City’s Architectural Garden

Azuma Sports Park

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

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