Mt. Adatara

Mt. Adatara

Mt. Adatara is actually made up of multiple active volcanoes that form a broad mountain. It last erupted in 1996. Poems in the book Chieko-sho by Kotaro Takamura (1883-1956) helped make the mountain famous.

The summit of Mt. Adatara stands at an altitude of 1700 m, stretching about 9 kilometers in a north-to-south direction. Views of Mt. Adatara are lovely in and of themselves, but the views that visitors have of the surrounding area once they reach the summit are breathtaking. Chosen as one of Japan’s top 100 mountains, as well as one of the top 100 mountains for flowers, a view spot at an altitude of 1300 m can be accessed by gondola lift. This means that it is relatively easy to climb even for beginners.

On summer evenings, a light-up event inspired by the Milky Way and the flowers of Mt. Adatara is held, gracing those scaling the mountain by a gondola lift with a spectacular view. In autumn, visitors are afforded a stunning view of autumn leaves making it a popular place for scenic momiji-gari (autumn leaf viewing).

Kurogane-goya Mountain Lodge (temporarily closed as of August 2023) is a rest stop for visitors (it serves as lodging for those on long hikes). Stay here overnight to sample the lodge's famous curry, which is reserved for overnight guests only. The lodge’s public hot spring facility uses naturally-sourced, cloudy hot spring water.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.nihonmatsu-kanko.jp/?p=462(Automated translation available)
Contact

Nihonmatsu Tourism Federation

(+81) 243-55-5122

Best SeasonAll Year
ParkingAvailable
Access Details
AccessOkudake Onsen, Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 964-0075
View directions
Getting there

The most popular trailhead for hiking Mt. Adatara is the Okudake Trailhead, starting at Adatara Kogen Ski Resort.

By Car: 20 min drive from Nihonmatsu I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

Mountain and Travel Course Guide

Useful Links

Adatara Illumination

Top 10 Places to See Autumn Leaves in Fukushima

Adatara Kogen Ski Resort

Enjoying Mt. Adatara in Autumn

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This is a museum dedicated to Eiji Tsuburaya the “Father of Tokusatsu,” or, the “Father of Japanese special effects.” There are exhibits relating to many of the monsters, “Kaijyu,” that are featured in many of Tsuburaya’s films including a Godzilla suit and Mothera egg!Eiji Tsuburaya is from Sukagawa City so you will also find statues around town of various Kaijyu and Ultraman characters from the Ultra-series, a series that was primarily created by Tsuburaya.©円谷プロ

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The Archive Center was opened on November 3rd, 2020 in order to share the unique artistry of Tokusatsu (Japanese special effects) with the world. Early Tokusatsu creator and Sukagawa Native, Eiji Tsuburaya came to be known as the “Father of Tokusatsu” due to his incredible Tokusatsu special effects in films such as Godzilla (1954) and television series such as the Ultra-series.Prior to the development of advanced digital and cgi special effects, science fiction films heavily relied on Tokusatsu techniques to create captivating live-action scenes where enormous monsters or Kaijyu wreak havoc upon cities. Smashing and exploding miniature models of cities allowed film makers to create incredible scenes for films and television.The Archine Center stores and displays many historic pieces that were used in or otherwise are related to the production of Tokusatsu films. There is even a special where visitors can watch Tokusatsu artists in action!©円谷プロ

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Okitsushima Shrine

Off the beaten track, Mt. Kohata’s Okitsushima Shrine is a perfect spot for those searching for a peaceful, spiritual place to visit. The shrine’s story – Date Masamune burned down Mt. Kohata in order to dominate the area during the Tensho Era (1563-1593), but couldn’t destroy the shrine’s three-storied pagoda – makes the area even more special. The three main goddesses of Shintoism – whose names are Princess Tagori, Princess Tagitsu, Princess Ichikishima – are worshipped at this shrine. These three goddesses are thought to be the daughters of the sun goddess Amaterasu, the major deity in the Shinto religion. It is not only Shintoism which is practiced at this shrine, but also Buddhism. In particular, the Japanese Buddhist goddess known as ‘Benten sama’ is worshipped on Mt. Kohata. Despite the turmoil which engulfed faith in Buddhism which occurred during the Meiji Era, strong faith in Benten sama – the Buddhist deity of peace, good luck, wisdom, and marriage – continues to this very day. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata.

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