Iizaka Kenka Matsuri (Iizaka Fighting Festival)

Iizaka Kenka Matsuri (Iizaka Fighting Festival)

This is one of the three major fighting festivals in Japan and has a tradition three hundred years in the making. This festival is so vibrant that throughout the town you can hear the beat of Japanese drums like an earthquake as huge floats crash together in battle. Hachiman Shrine becomes the main stage for the festival, after the floats are paraded around the streets.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://fukushima-guide.jp/event/iizaka-kenka-matsuri/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

fukushima.guide@f-kankou.jp

Best Season
  • Autumn
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessHachiman Shrine, 1 Yawata, Iizaka-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 962-0866
View directions
Getting there

By Train: Hachiman Shrine is a short walk from Iizaka Onsen Station on the Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Arts & Crafts

Sukagawa Enobori Yoshinoya Workshop

<p style="text-align:justify">Established in 1836, the Yoshinoya family has been continuing the production of Enobori banners using traditional techniques. Originally the family business was a kimono shop, however, the side business of painting Enobori banners began to grow until is eventually became their main business.</p><p style="text-align:justify">These banners typically feature images of warriors and can be quite complex with their designs. They are made by painting on banners with a type of calligraphy ink.</p><p style="text-align:justify">To create clean and uniform design, stencils are made from various materials to be used as a guide for the design. Once the basic design is painted with a stencil, you connect the lines and add fine details by hand.</p><p style="text-align:justify">As a nod to a famous Sukagawa person, they began creating a design of Ultraman posing as a samurai warrior! You can try out the traditional banner making method explained above to create tote bags and small banners featuring a variety of samurai and Ultraman samurai designs.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Bandai-Azuma Skyline Cycling Route

The Bandai-Azuma Skyline is one of the top cycling routes of Japan!  The route brings cyclists through dense green forests to volcanic terrain and sweeping views of Fukushima city and the volcanic peak of Mt. Kofuji, or “Little Fuji”. In autumn this course is warmed by vibrant autumn leaves, that make for a magical ride! Fukushima has routes for cyclists of all levels! Click here for more information about Cycling Courses and Events in Fukushima!  (Click here to read our blog about cycling the scenic Bandai-Azuma Skyline!)

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Pick-Your-Own Fruit in Fukushima City

Fukushima is renowned for its delicious fruits, and a wide variety of direct-sale farmer's fruit stalls, 30 minute all-you-can pick tourist orchards, and other fruit attractions can be found among the vast fruit fields and orchards that line the "Fruit Line," which is the nickname for a road that runs for 14 km along the base of Mt. Azuma, and the "Peach Line (National Road 13)," which runs along the train tracks. Come and enjoy the bounty of cherries, peaches, Japanese pears, grapes, and apples of Fukushima City, known as the Fruit Kingdom of Japan! See below for when each fruit is in season: Strawberries....January to May Cherries..........June to July Peaches..........July to September Nashi Pears....August to October Grapes............August to October Apples.............October to December

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