Iizaka Kenka Matsuri (Iizaka Fighting Festival)

Iizaka Kenka Matsuri (Iizaka Fighting Festival)

This is one of the three major fighting festivals in Japan and has a tradition three hundred years in the making. This festival is so vibrant that throughout the town you can hear the beat of Japanese drums like an earthquake as huge floats crash together in battle. Hachiman Shrine becomes the main stage for the festival, after the floats are paraded around the streets.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://iizaka.info/event-schedule/
Contact

Fukushima City Tourism & Convention Association

(+81) 24-563-5554

Best Season
  • Autumn
Entrance FeeFree
Access Details
AccessHachiman Shrine, 1 Yawata, Iizaka-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 962-0866
View directions
Getting there

By Train: Hachiman Shrine is a short walk from Iizaka Onsen Station on the Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line.

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