Shirakawa Daruma Market

Shirakawa Daruma Market

Shirakawa Daruma Market is held annually on February 11. On this date, the streets become lined for 1.5 km with stalls selling Daruma of all shapes and sizes. This lively, exciting market celebrates the culture and history of Shirakawa Daruma – a traditional doll which is characterised by having cranes for eyebrows, a tortoise for a moustache, beard made of bamboo, and pine and plum branches for cheeks, all of which make it a very auspicious item to keep at home.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://shirakawa315.com/eng/index.html
Contact

Shirakawa Tourism & Local Products Association

Best Season
  • Winter
Opening Hours

From: 2021-02-11 Until: 2021-02-11

Access Details
AccessTenjin-machi, Naka-machi, and Hon-machi in Shirakawa City
View directions
Getting there

Close to Shirakawa Station (JR Tohoku Main Line)

Nearby

Arts & Crafts

Hashimoto Buddhist Sculpture Shop

The Hashimoto Butsugu-Chokoku Ten (Hashimoto Buddhist Sculpture Shop) has a long history of over 160 years. Here visitors can try the truly unique experience of customizing their own lacquered chopsticks. Under careful instruction, you’ll be able to go home with your very own pair of one-of-a-kind chopsticks. The establishment sells many fine lacquerware products, from kitchen utensils and crockery to masks for use as decoration or at festivals. The chopstick-customizing workshop is available for 2,500 yen per person and is very popular for groups and couples. Even children (ages 12 and up) are able to do it with the supervision of adults and the instruction of the teacher. There are also pamphlets available in English for non-Japanese speakers. The workshop is easy to understand as the instructor guides you through the various steps until you are finally able to see the revealed layers of lacquer color on your own chopsticks. The chopstick experience workshop requires a reservation made at least five days in advance. While you are at the Hashimoto Buddhist Sculpture Shop, you will be guided through the six steps of making your own lacquered chopsticks. It will be an exciting experience as you begin with red or black chopsticks and slowly file down the layers of lacquer until the patterns are revealed. Traditionally, red chopsticks are for women and black are for men. Whichever color you choose though, these are certain to be your favorite set of chopsticks full of memories.  

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Grandee Hatoriko Ski Resort

Grandee Hatoriko Ski Resort offers many runs with relatively gentle slopes allowing beginners and families to safely ski down from the top of the mountain. The main slope also has a snow park, allowing visitors to show off their best tricks and jumps. Waves, mini-kickers and other equipment can also be found on the courses letting you get a bit of practice during your runs. Grandee also offers two conveyor belt lifts, so even ski and snowboard beginners can improve quickly. The beginner area is also separated with a net, making it safe even for small children.

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Mt. Azuma-Kofuji

Every year in spring, as the snow melts away it leaves behind the shape of a giant white rabbit on the side of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. This snow-made rabbit is called the “seeding rabbit” and it signals to the people of Fukushima that the farming season has come. No matter when you decide to visit Mt. Azuma-Kofuji, you can always experience the beauty of this awe-inspiring natural landscape. Mt. Azuma-Kofuji is actually an active volcano. It has an appealing symmetry to it, and a soft conical shape; it is because of these classic features that it was named Kofuji, or "little Fuji", after the iconic Japanese mountain. Thanks to the volcanic ground, the area has given birth to many nearby onsen areas which are perfect for relaxing, such as Tsuchiyu Onsen and Takayu Onsen. It’s also a great destination for those who decide to drive through the area as the Bandai-Azuma Skyline happens to pass just below the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji. It’s just a short hike up to the crater and there are plenty of other great trails in the area. Near the crater, along the roadway, stands Jododaira Visitor Center, which offers visitors a place to park, rest up, get a snack, and maybe even buy some souvenirs. It’s the perfect spot to take a break and explore one of the many short hiking routes to stretch out your muscles after a long car ride. Circle the crater of Mt. Azuma-Kofuji on a relaxed 40-minute walk and—if you’re lucky—enjoy gorgeous views of Fukushima City, Mt. Bandai, and the Urabandai area. But do watch your step as the ground can be uneven and even slippery on grey days. The mountain is open from spring to autumn every year.

You might also like

Nihonmatsu Lantern Festival
Event

Nihonmatsu Lantern Festival

Nihonmatsu Lantern Festival will be held on every year on the first Saturday, Sunday, and Monday of October. The highlight of the festival is the procession of festival floats which happens during the first evening. 7 large festival floats adorned with lanterns and filled with local people playing taiko drums make their way through the streets of Nihonmatsu City, filling the streets with festival music as they move. The final destination for the floats is Nihonmatsu Shrine. The view of the 3000 lanterns which are attached to the floats burning against the night sky is one that shouldn’t be missed.

Fukushima Waraji Festival
Event

Fukushima Waraji Festival

Fukushima City’s local summer festival ‘Fukushima Waraji Matsuri’ started in 1970. It is said that, despite its short history, this festival has its roots in an Edo Period traditional event known as the ‘Akatsuki-mairi’ (or Mt. Shinobu Dawn Procession). During the festival evenings, locals parade a huge straw sandal (known as a waraji) along Route 13. This procession is followed by many different groups, who perform dances around town. The first evening is filled with music from the Showa Era, while the songs of the second night are modern and very upbeat. This waraji weighs around 2 tons, is 12 metres in length, and is thought to be one of the biggest in Japan. Every February, local people follow the tradition of dedicating the waraji to Haguro Shrine on Mt. Shinobu, which is thought to help keep legs healthy and strong.

Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival)
Event

Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival)

The annual Kohata Hata Matsuri (Kohata Flag Festival) is 1 of the 3 main festivals in Japan centered on a dramatic procession of large flags, and has been held for over 960 years. The five hues of the brightly-colored flags rising up towards the sky makes for some fantastic views. Kohata Flag Festival, which has been designated as an Important Intangible Folk Cultural Property of Japan, is held annually on the first Sunday of December at Mt. Kohata. Mt. Kohata is home to the impressive Okitsushima Shrine.

Top