Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

This museum is dedicated to the works of the world-renowned woodblock print artist Kiyoshi Saito. Housing a collection of 850 of his works, including his well-known series 'Aizu no Fuyu (Winter in Aizu)', the museum also holds four special exhibitions a year with about 90 works displayed on each occasion.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.town.yanaizu.fukushima.jp/bijutsu/en/
Contact

Kiyoshi Saito Museum of Art

(+81) 241-42-3630

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. (Last entrance at 4:00 p.m.)

Closed: Mondays (Or the following Tuesday, when Monday is a national holiday)

ParkingAbout 80 cars including coaches (Common parking of the museum and the adjoining Michi-no-Eki Roadside Station)
Accommodation details

Pets: Not allowed

Related infoAdmission fee:

Adult: 510 yen

High school & college student: 300 yen

Primary & junior high school student: 200 yen

Discount rate available for groups of 15 or more
Access Details
Access187 Shimodaira Otsu, Yanaizu, Yanaizu Town, Kawanuma District, Fukushima Pref. 969-7201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 km from Aizu-Bange I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 30 min walk from Aizu-Yanaizu Station on the JR Tadami Line

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

The Warehouses of Kitakata

In the Meiji and Taisho eras, Kitakata City experienced a boom in the construction of kura (traditional Japanese storehouses). There are approximately 4,200 still left in the city today. While these were used both as storehouses for businesses in the brewing and lacquerware industries, the building of a kura has traditionally been considered among Kitakata locals as a great symbol of status, and a source of pride.In the Mitsuya District, the rows of brick storehouses are reminiscent of rural Europe, whereas in the Sugiyama district, they have roofs that take the appearance of helmets. Visitors can see a range of kura and other traditional buildings at Kitakata Kura-no-Sato museum, or enjoy exploring the kura of the city on foot or by bike.See here for a 1 day itinerary for visiting Kitakata City.Check out a map of the kura located around Kitakata City.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Former Takizawa Honjin

This honjin served as a rest house used by daimyo lords when they traveled to Edo (Tokyo) as part of the Sankin-kōtai system of alternate attendance, or when they conducted inspection tours. During the Boshin War, Domain Lord Matsudaira Katamori took command and the Byakkotai defended their city. The building still has sword marks and bullet holes from the war. The Former Takizawa Honjin is recognized as a nationally-designated Important Cultural Property.

The World Glassware Hall
History & Culture

Fukushima Prefectural Museum

The Fukushima Prefectural Museum (Fukushima Museum) [福島県立博物館] is in Aizu-Wakamatsu City, about a ten-minute walk (750 m) from Tsurugajo Castle. The museum covers the history of Fukushima prefecture from the primitive age through modern times with exhibitions of historical items, relics, scale models, and replicas of objects of historical significance.Its general exhibition is divided into six parts and explains the history of the area in chronological order. Starting with archaeological findings from the Glacial Age, the formation of the Japanese islands, and the first settlements (all covered in the Primitive Age section), the exhibits show the cultural developments and the evolving way of life through to modern times. The last exhibit, ‘Fukushima and its Nature’, details the prefecture’s ecosystems and how they have been impacted by natural disasters through the years.The museum also has departmental exhibition rooms that focus on Fukushima’s geological features and folk culture.Visitors can ask for an English guidebook at the entrance, which contains explanations of most items on exhibit. Information in English, Chinese, and Korean is displayed on some screen panels at the museum.The museum also houses a tea room, the Prefectural Museum Tea Room ‘Tsukinai’, that serves lunch and a variety of drinks. To the right of the main entrance is a recreational room for children. The room has a tatami area, children’s books, wooden toys, and decorations in traditional Aizu momen (cotton) textiles, which give it a unique, warm feel. Throughout the year, several special events and activities for children are hosted in this space.

You might also like

Ouchi-juku
History & Culture

Ouchi-juku

Take a journey to the past in Fukushima Prefecture’s Ouchi-juku area. This isolated village boasts thatched-roof houses and natural streets making you feel at one with the people who lived here hundreds of years ago.Nestled in the southwestern mountains of Fukushima, Ouchi-juku is a great spot to visit thanks to its unique charm and history. This village was established under the post station system of the Edo period, and played a vital role as a rest stop for travelers.In 1981, the well-preserved streets of Ouchi-juku led to it being designated as an Important Preservation District for a Group of Traditional Buildings. It isn’t difficult to see why—the village looks as it did during its heyday. And with no telephone or electric wires above ground, the view from the top of the hill overlooking the village is marvelous.It is a picturesque village where you can lose yourself to the flow of time. The traveler’s road that used to run through this village was called the Shimotsuke Kaido Route, or the Aizu Nishi Kaido Route.Ouchi-juku not only connected Aizu to Nikko, it also connected Aizu-Wakamatsu to Imaichi, a post town on the Nikko Kaido Route in Tochigi Prefecture. This road was frequented by many travelers as well as by the processions of feudal lords who had to travel to and from Edo periodically.Travelers of the Edo Period rested at the inns of Ouchi-juku to relieve their fatigue. Nowadays, festivals and events help draw in new visitors. The annual Snow Festival in February turns Ouchi-juku into a pretty candlelit scene.Visit in July to see a procession of dancers dressed in traditional Edo Period costumes, and you might even get to wear a happi (festival attire jacket) and join the locals in their celebrations!And when you’re feeling hungry be sure to try some of the local specialties, which include negi soba (fresh buckwheat noodles eaten using a green onion), stick-roasted char fish, and more.There’s a little bit of everything at Ouchi-juku.

Morohashi Museum of Modern Art
History & Culture

Morohashi Museum of Modern Art

This museum, which opened in June 1999, is located a short walk from the Goshiki-numa Ponds, which is one of the most scenic spots in Fukushima Prefecture.Morohashi Museum of Modert Art houses a collection of about 350 of the works of Salvador Dali, the master Spanish surrealist artist, including paintings, prints, and sculptures, as well as about 40 works by such impressionist and post-impressionist artists as Cézanne, Renoir, Chagall, Picasso, and Van Gogh. About 100 works out of this collection are on permanent exhibition, including 37 works of sculpture by Dali. The scale of this collection is unparalleled in the world and really is worth seeing.

Hideyo Noguchi Memorial Museum
History & Culture

Hideyo Noguchi Memorial Museum

Most people probably don’t know who Hideyo Noguchi (1876-1928) is by name but just look at a 1,000-yen note and you’ll know his face. A renowned bacteriologist, Noguchi made great advances in the research of a vaccine for yellow fever. He’s also credited with the discovery of the agent which causes syphilis.This memorial museum was established to honor the Nobel-nominated bacteriologist, and to introduce his life achievements. The house where Noguchi was born stands within the museum grounds. Visitors to the house can see the fireplace where he fell as a child, leading to him seriously burning his left hand. The alcove post of the house has carved into it the words of resolution Noguchi made before he went to Tokyo.The exhibition room contains many resources that introduce Noguchi's life and accomplishments, including his favorite articles, letters, and photographs. In Noguchi's laboratory, which was recreated for the memorial museum, visitors can interact with a robot designed in the image of Noguchi. The robot answers questions from visitors and gives them encouraging messages.Though the house retains its Meiji Period charm, the hall and facilities were renovated in April 2015, during which time the experience-based corner was added. Here, guests can learn about bacteriology through videos and interactive games.Aizu-Ichiban Café, a café which renovated from the clinic where Hideo Noguchi received treatment for the burns he suffered to his left hand, is located nearby. Once named Kaihiyo Clinic, this is where he spent much of his youth and acquired his motivation to study and ambition to help others. There are also a number of his belongings on display, making it an interesting place to visit after a trip to the museum.

Top