The World Glassware Hall

The World Glassware Hall

The World Glassware Hall is located at the foot of Mt. Bandai, by the side of Lake Inawashiro.

About 25,000 handmade glassware items, imported directly from countries all over the world, are exhibited and sold at the World Glassware Hall the museum. You can even try your hand at glass etching, or glass blowing.

Next to the Glassware Hall is a local beer brewery and a sweets shop. Local Inawashiro beer has received the gold prize in an international beer competition, and can be purchased on site. In the sweets shop, you can try a line up of famous local delicacies.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttp://www.world-glassware.com/(Japanese)
Contact

The World Glassware Hall

(+81) 242-63-0100

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

Open 365 days a year

ParkingAvailable (Space for 350 cars)
Entrance FeeFree (30 min Glass-Etching Experience: 1080 yen)
Related info<u>Opening Hours</u>

Mar. 11 to Apr. 10: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Apr. 11 to Jul. 10: 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Jul. 11 to Oct. 10: 9:00 am - 6:00 pm

Oct. 11 to Nov. 10: 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

Nov. 11 to Jan. 10: 9:30 am - 5:00 pm

Jan. 11 to Mar. 10: 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Access Details
AccessMurahigashi-85, Mitsuwa, Inawashiro Town, Yama District, Fukushima Pref. 969-3284
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 7 min from Inawashiro-Bandaikogen I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway.

By Train: 10 min taxi or bus ride from Inawashiro Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Outdoor Activities

Watersports at S.A.Y (Lake Inawashiro)

A wakeboard shop located on the northwest shore of Lake Inawashiro in Fukushima Prefecture. It offers easy access from the Kanto region, bypassing major traffic congestion. Individuals and beginners are welcome. A specialized beginner's course is available, allowing even first-timers to enjoy their time on the water, and all necessary equipment can be rented. Bookings can be made even for 1 person. Why not spend a day enjoying the beautiful, clear waters of Lake Inawashiro, one of the most breathtaking lakes in Japan?

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