Mt. Bandai Eruption Memorial Museum

Mt. Bandai Eruption Memorial Museum

This museum introduces the eruption of Mt. Bandai, and uses large sized models and "body sonic" facilities to give a simulated experience of the eruption in 1888 of Mt. Bandai. The plants and animals that live around Mt. Bandai are introduced using a diorama, and nature observation meetings are held several times a year. This museum has wheelchair access and bathroom facilities.

The museum is across the road from Mt. Bandai 3D World, and a combined entrance ticket is available for the two facilities.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.urabandai-inf.com/en/?page_id=25002
Contact

Urabandai Tourism Association

(+81) 241-32-2333

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

8:00 AM - 5:00 PM (Dec. - Mar.: 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM).

Open every day

Entrance FeeAdults: 600 yen<br>Junior high school students: 500 yen<br> Elementary school students: 400 yen <br>(Ticket set with Mt. Bandai 3D world available)
Accommodation details

Pets: In principle allowed

Access Details
Access1093-36 Kengamine, Hibara, Kitashiobara Village, Fukushima Pref. 969-2701
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 25 min from Inawashiro-Bandaikogen I.C. exit off the Ban-etsu Expressway

By Train: 25 min bus ride from Inawashiro Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line)

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