Suehiro Sake Brewery Kaeigura

Suehiro Sake Brewery Kaeigura

Suehiro Sake Brewery was founded at the end of the Edo Period, in the mid 19th century. The Kaeigura (the building where the sake is brewed) has been designated as an important historical building by Aizu-Wakamatsu City. Here, visitors can take a guided tour of the sake-brewing process, as well as of old Japanese-style rooms which were built during the Meiji Period. The brewing process takes place from October to March every year. During this time, visitors can see the process and conditions inside the fermentation tanks. Visitors may try between six and ten different kinds of sake for free year-round. Suehiro sake and other Aizu products are available for sale on-site. On the left side after entering the gate stands a café called Kissa Ann. The architecture of Kissa Ann was remodelled from the Kaeigura's oldest storehouse. Here, you can enjoy coffee made with water prepared especially for making sake, and cake made using high-quality sake.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.sake-suehiro.jp/(Japanese)
Contact

Suehiro Shuzo Co., Ltd. Kaeigura

(+81) 242-27-0002

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Closed on Dec. 31 and Jan. 1

ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoTours start every 30 min from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM (Japanese only)
Access Details
Access12-38 Nisshinmachi, Aizu-Wakamatsu City, Fukushima Pref. 965-0861
View directions
Getting there

By Train: 20 min walk from Aizuwakamatsu Station (JR Ban-etsu West Line), or a 10 min taxi ride from the station.

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