Fukushima Waraji Festival

Fukushima Waraji Festival

Fukushima City’s local summer festival ‘Fukushima Waraji Matsuri’ started in 1970. It is said that, despite its short history, this festival has its roots in an Edo Period traditional event known as the ‘Akatsuki-mairi’ (or Mt. Shinobu Dawn Procession).

During the festival evenings, locals parade a huge straw sandal (known as a waraji) along Route 13. This procession is followed by many different groups, who perform dances around town. The first evening is filled with music from the Showa Era, while the songs of the second night are modern and very upbeat.

This waraji weighs around 2 tons, is 12 metres in length, and is thought to be one of the biggest in Japan. Every February, local people follow the tradition of dedicating the waraji to Haguro Shrine on Mt. Shinobu, which is thought to help keep legs healthy and strong.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.waraji.co.jp/(Japanese)
Contact

Fukushima Waraji Festival Executive Committee

(+81) 24-536-5511

fcci@fukushima-cci.or.jp

Best Season
  • Summer
Related infoThis festival takes place in the evenings (Usually from 5:30 PM to 9:30 PM)
Event RecurrenceThe 2020 festival date is yet to be announced. (Usually held on the first Friday and Saturday of August. There is possibility of change depending on the year.)
Access Details
AccessRoute 13 in Central Fukushima City
View directions
Getting there

By Train: 5 min walk from JR Fukushima Station

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Arts & Crafts

Sukagawa Enobori Yoshinoya Workshop

<p style="text-align:justify">Established in 1836, the Yoshinoya family has been continuing the production of Enobori banners using traditional techniques. Originally the family business was a kimono shop, however, the side business of painting Enobori banners began to grow until is eventually became their main business.</p><p style="text-align:justify">These banners typically feature images of warriors and can be quite complex with their designs. They are made by painting on banners with a type of calligraphy ink.</p><p style="text-align:justify">To create clean and uniform design, stencils are made from various materials to be used as a guide for the design. Once the basic design is painted with a stencil, you connect the lines and add fine details by hand.</p><p style="text-align:justify">As a nod to a famous Sukagawa person, they began creating a design of Ultraman posing as a samurai warrior! You can try out the traditional banner making method explained above to create tote bags and small banners featuring a variety of samurai and Ultraman samurai designs.</p><p style="text-align:justify">&copy;円谷プロ</p>

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