Fujita River Fureai-Zakura Cherry Blossom

Fujita River Fureai-Zakura Cherry Blossom

Somei Yoshino cherry blossom trees bloom along both sides of the Fujita River for three kilometers, centering around Horinouchi Bridge near Kikuta Station.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.kanko-koriyama.gr.jp/tourism/detail5-1-426.html(Automated translation available)
Contact

Koriyama City Tourism Association

(+81) 24‐924-2621

Best Season
  • Spring
ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoBest viewing period: Mid-April
Access Details
AccessShimokawara, Horinouchi, Kikuta-machi, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 15 min from Koriyama I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway.

By Train: 3 min on foot from Kikuta Station on the JR Ban-etsu West Line.

Nearby

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

The World Glassware Hall
Historical Sites

Kasumigajo Castle Park (Nihonmatsu Castle)

Nihonmatsu Castle was built in 1643 by Mitsushige Niwa, the first feudal lord of the Nihonmatsu Domain. This domain had command over a territory producing 100,000 koku of rice (one koku being the amount of rice needed to feed one man for a year) and Nihonmatsu Castle was one of the strategic points used by the Tokugawa Shogunate forces. The castle fell in Boshin War after a fierce battle, precipitating the tragedy of the Nihonmatsu Youth Corps. Today, the castle ruins have been turned into a prefectural natural park, with the stone walls being the only structures remaining from the old days. The seasonal beauty of the landscape with the restored castle and the surrounding natural environment is a soothing experience for visitors, particularly in the spring when the 1,700 cherry trees in the park are in full bloom, making it seem as if the castle is surrounded by haze of blossoms. This is why Nihonmatsu Castle is also referred to as "Kasumigajo" (meaning "castle in the mist"). In autumn, the park is crowded with visitors to Japan's largest chrysanthemum doll festival.

The World Glassware Hall
Nature & Scenery

Miharu Takizakura

Miharu is a small town in central Fukushima Prefecture. The town’s name means “three springs” and it is easy to see how it got such a name. With cherry, plum, and peach trees blossoming in spectacular displays every spring, it is almost as if spring has tripled! But the most famous of the trees in Miharu is the Miharu Takizakura tree, which is a nationally recognized Natural Monument. Over ten centuries old, the beautiful Miharu Takizakura is a flowering cherry tree that spreads out in all directions and makes for a breathtaking vista. The cascading blankets of blossoms are how this tree got the name takizakura, or “waterfall cherry tree.” It is even one of the “three great cherry trees” of Japan (along with Usuzumizakura in Gifu and the Jindaizakura in Yamanashi Prefecture). Miharu Takizakura sits in a sakura hollow in order to protect it from the elements while providing excellent drainage. The heavy boughs of the tree are supported by wooden beams and lend to its elegant form. The Miharu Takizakura begins blooming from mid-April. During the day the sight is whimsical, but visit in the evening and you’ll be treated to an almost haunting beauty as the tree is illuminated. Aside from this huge cherry tree (over 12 meters tall and 18 to 22 meters in spread), the area is also blessed with various wildflowers, including cherry and rapeseed flowers. But, of course, the Miharu Takizakura is what the annual 200,000 visitors are there to see. The view from the base of the sakura is considered to be the most beautiful and the Miharu Takizakura often ranks as the best sakura tree in all of Japan.

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Koori Town's Peach Blossoms
Nature & Scenery

Koori Town's Peach Blossoms

Koori Town, home to some 236 acres of peach orchards, is a wonderful place to view peach blossoms when spring rolls around. 24,000 trees fill the 120 hectares of peach orchards located along the banks of the Abukuma in Koori Town's Danzaki area - many of these are located along a road known locally as 'the Peach Line'. When these flowers all open their petals in unison, the landscape is transformed into a sea of pink, truly a utopian vista. Their Majesties the Emperor and Empress (the Crown Prince and Princess at the time) walked through this orchard on April 26 1996 - an event which is commemorated with a memorial tablet that stands along the Peach Line. Visitors to the peach orchards on the banks of the Abukuma river will be treated to views of Mt. Handa, the symbol of Koori Town. The best time to visit the peach orchards is mid-April.

Kassenba's Weeping Cherry Tree
Nature & Scenery

Kassenba's Weeping Cherry Tree

These two weeping cherry trees are said to be the grandchildren of the great Miharu Takizakura weeping cherry tree in nearby Miharu Town. They bloom with fantastic pink flowers. When they are in full bloom, the trees are if a waterfall of blossoms is cascading from their branches. These trees are estimated to be around 170 years old. We recommend taking photographs from the bottom of the slope, so you can capture the pink of the blossoms, together with the blue of the sky, and yellow of the canola flowers.

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