Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre

Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre

A foothold for the promotion of farming in Fukushima Prefecture - the size of 12 Tokyo Domes!

Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre is a new foothold for the promotion of agricultural in Fukushima Prefecture. It serves as a hub for the spread of technological development and safe agricultural practices, as well as being an important facility for agricultural education.

The Centre has strengthened a system of experimentation and research in order to provide technical support to local farmers, and is spreading awareness of the importance of agriculture and of making use of open facilities (such as the Centre's Exchange Building and farming exhibitions) among local consumers and children. The facilities include the Management & Research Building, the Experiment Building, the Exhibition Greenhouse, and the Exchange Building, which is constructed from lumber grown locally in Fukushima Prefecture. From the observation deck, you can take in an expansive view of the entire facility.

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://www.pref.fukushima.lg.jp/sec/37200a/(Japanese)
Contact

Fukushima Agricultural Technology Centre

(+81) 24-958-1700

nougyou.jouhou@pref.fukushima.jp

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 4:30 PM throughout the year, except for the year-end and New Year holidays.

Parking84 cars
Entrance FeeFree
Related infoLanguages available: Japanese only
Non-Japanese Pamphlets: Available (Korean)
Visitor limit: Up to about 100
Facility guided tour: Available upon request
Access Details
Access116 Shimonakamichi, Takakura, Hiwada-Machi, Koriyama City, Fukushima Pref.
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 5 min from Motomiya I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway. Head east after getting off the Tohoku Expressway. Turn right at the T intersection.

By Taxi: 20 min from Koriyama Station on the JR Tohoku Main Line.

By Train: 25 min walk from Gohyakugawa Station on the JR Tohoku Line.

Nearby

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Mt. Iwatsuno is the name of a hill in Motomiya City which is populated with numerous temples, shrines, carvings, statues, caves, and other ancient things. Mt. Iwatsuno has long been known as a place for Shugendo and other religious training for Buddhist monks from the school of Tendai. One of the most notable of Mt. Iwatsuno's temples is Gankakuji Temple, which was founded in 851. Other highlights include Okunoin, located at the top of Mt. Iwatsuno, which was built in the Kamakura Era, and Bisshamondo, which was rebuilt in the mid-19th century. Mt. Iwatsuno can be explored on foot in around 1 hour, but visitors can easily spend longer if they want to explore all of the hidden treasures the hill has to offer. It's possible for groups to do Zazen meditation on the hillside if visitors contact Mt. Iwatsuno in advance (bookings must be conducted in Japanese).

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Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons)

Shiki no Sato (Village of Four Seasons) is a lawn-covered agricultural park of about 8 ha in size. There are western-inspired brick buildings in the center, which house a traditional crafts gallery. The gallery includes a glass workshop and kokeshi (traditional wooden doll) exhibit. You can learn to make blown glass, see kokeshi being made by local artisans, and try your hand at decorating a doll of your own. Shiki no Sato also has an ice cream shop offering seasonal ice creams made with the local fruits of Fukushima. In addition to ice cream, you can try a variety of locally-produced beers at the Shiki no Sato's beer hall. The seasonal flowers are a highlight of a visit to Shiki no Sato, which is loved by families and young couples alike. The summertime firework displays and the winter light-ups in the park are some of the most popular times to visit.

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Ryusenji Temple

Ryusenji Temple is the perfect place to refresh the mind and body during your trip to Fukushima Prefecture. Originally built in 1320, the temple underwent many name changes until being called Ryusenji. The beautiful main hall has not changed for about 300 years after being reconstructed due to a fire in 1758. Nowadays, the temple offers many interesting events and vistas to visitors. There are many sights to experience at Ryusenji. Inside the main hall of the temple, you can see a cloth bag containing the temple’s treasures and a palanquin-shaped box hanging from the ceiling. This important Cultural Property also contains many wooden statues and make for an impressive time amongst history. If you would like a more personal experience at Ryusenji Temple, why not try the Zazen meditation experience offered by the temple’s monks? Zazen is a short zen meditation experience and is offered at Ryusenji Temple on the first Sunday of every month, as well as the first and third Wednesdays of every month. Sit in silence and stillness for 20 minutes while you empty yourself of worldly thoughts and desires. It’s best to contact ahead of time to make reservations if you’d like to experience their Zazen, temple yoga, or calligraphy. The nature surrounding Ryusenji Temple and the calming halls of the temple will welcome you and give you peace of mind and spirit. So shed the busy angst of your life and let Ryusenji Temple offer you a serene experience.

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The Bandai-Azuma Skyline is a 29-kilometer sightseeing road to the west of Fukushima City. The roadway makes for a lovely drive as it weaves its way through the Azuma Mountain Range, tying together Takayu Onsen and the Tsuchiyu Mountain Pass. It has even been nicknamed “the road that runs across the sky” as it offers such spectacular panoramic views of Fukushima City and the beautiful countryside. The road opens for the season in early April, coinciding with cherry blossom viewing season in Fukushima City. At Fukushima City's Hanamiyama, you can see the rare combination of cherry blossoms and snow in the course of a single day.

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