Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei

Kyu Horikiri-tei is a property steeped in history. Built in 1775, the building has been preserved since the Edo Period thanks to wealthy farmers and merchants. The property contains a large kura (storehouse), called Jukken Kura, as well as a traditional Japanese manor house.

There is a public footbath located onsite. Use of the public footbath - which gets its water from the nearby onsen hot spring source - is accessible for wheelchair users. Japanese-speaking volunteer guides, knowledgeable about the history of Kyu Horikiri-tei and the rest of Iizaka Onsen, are available upon request.

 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://iizaka.info/sightseeing-spots/
Contact

Iizaka Onsen Tourism Association

(+81) 24-542-4241

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 AM - 9:00 PM

Open all year

Entrance FeeFree
Related infoThere are some signs in English.

Wheelchair rental available.

Wheelchair-accessible toilet and ostomate toilet available available inside the grounds.
Access Details
AccessHigashi-takinomachi 16, Iizaka-machi, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-0201
View directions
Getting there

By Car: 10 min drive from Fukushima-Iizaka I.C. exit off the Tohoku Expressway

By Train: 5 min on foot from Iizaka Onsen Station (Fukushima Kotsu Iizaka Line)

Useful Links

Iizaka Onsen

Iizaka Onsen & Kenka Matsuri Autumn Festival

Getting To Iizaka Onsen By Train

Related trips

  1. Culture

    Onsen and Relaxation Tour

    Take a 2-day tour of relaxation, history, and culture on this trip you can enjoy by train or taxi. You’ll journey around Fukushima Prefecture to see some stunning sights and relax in some of the best springs. Begin your first day at Fukushima Station where you will travel to Iizaka Onsen by a quick bus ride. Iizaka Onsen has been a famous hot spring town of Japan for more than 1,000 years. Soak up the rejuvenating waters and history that has inspired countless artists and poets of the past before moving to Nakano Fudoson Temple. Founded some 800 years ago, this famous temple has three minor deities worshipped on the grounds. Find your own inner peace as you take in the cleansing atmosphere and breathe in the culture and history. From Nakano Fudoson Temple, visit Kyu Horikiri-tei, a former residence of the Horikiri family from the Edo Period. Enjoy soaking your feet in the foot bath and taking this calming scenery. You’ll enjoy your time by both relaxing and exploring the past.

    Onsen and Relaxation Tour

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