Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (Roadside Stop)

Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (Roadside Stop)

Newly opened in 2022, Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (道の駅ふくしま)is a great place to buy local produce, souvenirs, and eat delicious Fukushima foods! Or even just to pause for a break along your road trip.

It is located near the Fukushima Fruit line, so you’ll find a good assortment of delicious fresh fruit on display. You can also go fruit-picking to the nearby orchards using the rental bicycles available.

Click here for more information on fruit picking in Fukushima!

There is a dog park and an indoor play area for children called Momo Rabi Kids Park, which has many cute wooden toys and structures for children to play at as well as an indoor sandpit.

We recommend trying the unusual ice-cream flavors at ‘yukiusagi’, a sweets shop that sells delicious parfaits and desserts using local produce. They sell rice-flavored ice-cream, as well as a special flavor called “Fukushima’s Sky Milk”(ふくしまの空ミルク), which has a salty milk flavor!

 

Venue Details

Venue Details
Websitehttps://m-fukushima.com/ (Japanese)
Contact

Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (Roadside Stop)
024-572-4588
https://m-fukushima.com/contact/

Best SeasonAll Year
Opening Hours

9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.<br>Each facility has different opening hours.

ParkingAvailable
Entrance FeeFree entrance
Access Details
Access1-1 Tsukizaki Ozaso, Fukushima City, Fukushima Pref. 960-0251
View directions
Getting there

By car: Approx. 20. min from Fukushima station by Prefectural Road No. 3

By bus: Only on weekdays, shuttle buses run between Michi-no-Eki Fukushima and Fukushima station twice a day (from the Fukushima Station East Exit (福島駅東口) bus stop platform 12). Take the bus to Nakano Via Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (道の駅ふくしま経由中野行き). Get off at Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (道の駅ふくしま). The bus ride takes about 19 minutes.

On weekends, take the Ozaso Idai Line Bus that goes through the by-pass (大笹生・医大線[バイパス経由])  at Fukushima Station East Exit (福島駅東口) and get off at Mizuguchi (水口). The bus ride takes approx. 17 minutes. From there, it’s a 12 min. walk to Michi-no-Eki Fukushima (1.1 km).

 

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